The First Remote Viewing Experiment—Documented

Saturday, 20 May 2017 by

Treasures from the University of West Georgia’s collection of the
private papers of Ingo Swann

The research for Ashton Gray’s book Watergate: The Hoax involved more than a dozen researchers whose contributions over the course of nearly two decades accumulated into a massive database—searchable, and sortable by date—of over 13,000 entries.

At the outset of the research, no one could have guessed that the investigations would lead them to the Central Intelligence Agency’s “remote viewing” program, which began the same year as Watergate: 1972. But it did. And that track of research ultimately led a seasoned researcher off on a trip to the University of West Georgia to review the permanent collection of private papers of Scientology OT VII Ingo Swann, accompanied on the quest by a volunteer research associate: a teacher named Meredith Wilson.

In the university’s research room, the curator of the collection brought them box after box of original, one-of-a-kind documents, a treasure trove of gems of information found nowhere else in the world. Many of those documents are cited in Watergate: The Hoax, supplying crucial pieces that had been missing from all previous literature on Watergate and the CIA’s remove viewing program.

One of those invaluable gems was a startling find: documentation of the very first, ever, experiment in “remote viewing,” conducted with Ingo Swann by Dr. Janet Mitchell at the American Society of Psychical Research (ASPR) in New York City. In fact, it is the experiment that caused Ingo Swann to coin the term “remote viewing.” Swann had said in several autobiographical works that he had coined the term on December 8, 1971, after this experiment of the same date, and other authors have discussed the fact, but there has been no known contemporaneous record of the event—until now.

The University of West Georgia did not allow photocopying of the papers, but kindly gave permission to the researchers to take photos of important papers with their phones, and to make limited use of such images for historical and educational purposes. Given the historic importance of these two pages of documents, we feel an obligation—and an honor—to present them here for the public good.

A note about the two pages below: Although the experiment took place on December 8, 1971, Swann’s monitor who was conducting the experiment, Dr. Janet Mitchell, wrote up her notes about it several days later, after checking several newspapers to verify Swann’s results, and after another experiment she mentions that took place on December 11, 1971. Her write-up is on different paper that was glued onto two different sheets of paper with page numbers 71 and 72—part of a historical account that had been compiled, found among the collection. That’s why her report has a different shade in the black-and-white images. Here are the photos taken of the documents at the university:

 

Here is a text transcript of those two pages:

[page number] 71

FIRST INFORMAL LONG-DISTANCE REMOTE VIEWING EXPERIMENT AT THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL RESEARCH.
J. Mitchell and I. Swann, 8 December 1971.

The following report is informal, and should be considered an example of a spontaneous task that took place while waiting instrumentation alignments for formal experiments that were in progress at the ASPR.

In view of subsequent controlled long-distance remote viewing experiments at Stanford Research Institute, however, this first impromptu feat is provided for the record.

[Janet Mitchell report glued to document pages]:

Ingo Swann – 12/8/71

At the 13th minute on this record Ingo reported over the intercom that he was going to Arizona. He goes out there often.

He then said it was cloudy and cold over Tucson. Using this infor mation as a sort of target, I checked out the weather in Tucsdn for that day.

N.Y. Times, Dec. 9, 1971, p. 93 – Weather is reported for a 24-hour period from 7PM on Dec. 7th to 7PM on Dec. 8th. The high for Tucson was 3 8 degrees. The low was 30 degrees. Precipitation at .68. General condition was cloudy.

N.Y. Times, Dec. 8, 1971, p. 110 – Report from 7PM Dec. 6th to 7PM Dec. 7th for Tucson. High – 54, Low – 42, Precipitation – .02, General Condition – Cloudy.

[page number] 72

As you can see, it was definitely cold and cloudy over Tucson on Dec. 8, 1971. So, Ingo is getting information about the target box in the room correct and weather conditions as far as 3,000 miles away correct.

Minutes 2 & 3 when Ingo was looking in the box show less beta and more theta: 38-10-13, 36-07-19

Minutes 13 & 14 when Ingo was in Arizona more beta and less theta: 47-09-06, 49-06-07

This finding is not consistent on other records – see 12/11, Minute 3 and 11/24 for both box and Arizona readings.

As one more note: A host of people who are hopelessly ignorant of the facts, and apparently want to remain that way, have stridently claimed all over the Internet that Ingo Swann’s abilities had nothing to do with Scientology. Those people will absolutely hate this image below, and will try to wish it out of existence, but it is from a carbon copy Swann saved of a letter he wrote to L. Ron Hubbard on July 6, 1972—one month to the day after Swann’s famous incident when he affected the sealed magnetometer in the Varian Hall of Physics at Stanford University. Swann addressed the letter to Hubbard “Via A. Maren,” who was Artie Maren, then in Scientology’s Guardian’s Office in Los Angeles. In the letter, Swann is discussing his successes in the fields of parapsychology, when he says this:

The text of the relevant highlighted portion:

Nothing I can do, which includes the ability of precise communication through and up to various OT phenomena, could have been possible in the controlled state without your genius and the training and auditing which I have undertaken in Scientology.

—Ingo Swann to L. Ron Hubbard, July 6, 1972

At the time of this writing, no other investigative report or book has cited, quoted, or made use of this extraordinary collection of documents—except for Ashton Gray’s Watergate: The Hoax. Chalet Books is proud to be associated with this groundbreaking work, and honored to be able to present these historic facts to the world.

CIA Eagle Outline Art-4
Ashton Gray’s Watergate: The Hoax shreds the lies and myths about Watergate. It is finally rewriting the history books with the truth. Don’t be left out of this intellectual and historical revolution that rips the veil off of some of the dirtiest secrets in the history of the United States, and exposes the biggest crime against man’s storehouse of knowledge in the history of the world. Buy it, read it, give it to your friends and loved ones. “And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”

 

 

Watergate: The Hoax is available now
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CIA Crimes of Watergate: The Sea Project, Ingo Swann, and a Damned Liar

Tuesday, 5 April 2016 by

Watergate-Hoax-5a-CHANGE-Kindle-Smashwords-EYEFIX-FINAL72
This is an excerpt from the book  Watergate: The Hoax, by Ashton Gray, now on sale at AmazoniBooks, Barnes & Noble, and other fine book retailers. This is taken from Chapter 16, “The Sea Project, Ingo Swann, and a Damned Liar”:

Whatever he [L. Ron Hubbard] did in Tangier at the beginning of 1967, he was going to be coming back there. On this trip, he stayed in Tangier until nearly the end of February, when he flew to an old familiar place: Las Palmas, Canary Islands. He was there to meet up with his ship the Enchanter, which arrived there on 25 February 1967.

This event brings up an anecdote that is a classic example of the kind of uncorroborated gossip and garbage that is the stock-in-trade for the Hubbard hatchet-job “biographers” from Britain, all of them in league with the CIA and the Five Eyes. It’s embodied in the following melodramatic “account” of Hubbard’s arrival in Las Palmas to meet the Enchanter, told in Russell Miller’s Bare-Faced Messiah by one Virginia Downsborough, who opened herself to any smearer of Hubbard who wanted to probe her. She claimed to have been aboard the Enchanter, coming from Hull with a small crew—even though other sources cited in this book say the ship was in Clearwater, Florida, when purchased, and that Downsborough arrived later on a different ship, the Avon River. According to her, though, she and the Enchanter had already arrived when Hubbard got to Las Palmas, flying in from Tangier:

We found him a hotel in Las Palmas and next day I went back to see if he was all right, because he did not seem to be too well.

When I went in to his room there were drugs of all kinds everywhere. He seemed to be taking about sixty thousand different pills. I was appalled, particularly after listening to all his tirades against drugs and the medical profession. There was something very wrong with him, but I didn’t know what it was except that he was in a state of deep depression; he told me he didn’t have any more gains and he wanted to die. That’s what he said: “I want to die.” . . .

I moved into an adjoining room in the hotel to take care of him. He refused to eat the hotel food, so I got a little hotplate and cooked meals for him in the room, simple things, things that he liked. My main concern was to try and get him off all the pills he was on. . . .

I don’t know what drugs he was taking—they certainly weren’t making him high—but I knew I had to get him over it. I discussed it with him and gradually took them away. He didn’t carry on about it. He had brought a great pile of unopened mail with him from Tangier, a lot of it from Mary Sue, and I got him to start reading her letters. After about three weeks he decided he would get out of bed.

It’s oh-so-breathy, isn’t it? It’s been quoted and requoted and told and retold all over the Internet, all over the world, to “prove” what a fraud ol’ Hubbard was, taking all these drugs—about 60,000 different pills, don’t you know!—and being depressed, and lying in bed for three whole weeks. So much for the effectiveness of Scientology.

There’s one slight problem with Ms. Downsborough’s self-aggrandizing Florence Nightingale act: She and the miserable hack Russell Miller didn’t check the microfiche records for HASI, Inc., at the Arizona Corporation Commission. If they had, they would have discovered that on 28 February 1967—just three days after Hubbard met the Enchanter in Las Palmas on 25 February—he was nowhere near Las Palmas or any hotel there, hotplate or not; he was over 2,000 miles away, in the little burg of Crawley, West Sussex, England, where he and Mary Sue signed a notarized annual report for HASI, Inc. Crawley is 9.7 miles from East Grinstead, home of Saint Hill Manor. The annual report covered the fiscal year that had ended on 30 April 1966. [Below is a detail from that document, showing the date and signatures. —Ed.]

1967-02-28-HASI-Document-DETAIL-150

So the question becomes whether Ms. Downsborough is merely a self-aggrandizing muck-raking liar, or a damned self-aggrandizing muck-raking liar. (Miller unquestionably is the latter.)

 

 

 

Watergate: The Hoax is available now
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Barnes & Noble.
Order it today!

Rewrite history with the truth!

 

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Part I: The Great Mystery of Scientology’s 1972 Moroccan Missions

Saturday, 31 October 2015 by

Part I of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the landmark book Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

L. Ron Hubbard

L. Ron Hubbard

There have been numerous published claims that in 1972, sometime after the Watergate arrests, L. Ron Hubbard ordered that three “missions” be sent out from his Scientology Flagship, the Apollo, to interact with the highest military intelligence levels of the Islamic monarchy of King Hassan II of Morocco.

At the time of the alleged missions, as the stories go, Hubbard reportedly was either onboad the Apollo in the port of Tangier, Morocco, or was residing in a villa in Tangier, called the Villa Laure, along with his wife, Mary Sue Hubbard, and some number of his most trusted retinue. The reports about where he was, and when, during the purported missions are both vague and contradictory, which will be addressed later in this series.

In tracing back the source of the claims about these alleged Scientology missions involving Hassan II’s security forces, they all seemed to originate from one primary source, a man named Amos Jessup, who has claimed to have been involved as a participant with all three of the missions. No earlier source could be found.

At the time of the purported missions, Jessup was highly placed in Hubbard’s “Sea Organization,” or “Sea Org,” the command and control organization that managed all of Scientology around the world for Hubbard. The Sea Org also sent out Scientology “missions”—groups of Sea Org members ordered to various locations for various purposes related to Scientology management and expansion.

According to our best information and belief, Amos Jessup is the son of John Jessup, who had been part of the inner circle of the Time-Life conglomerate in its several incarnations. Getty Images, for instance, has a photo from 5 August 1960 of “Time Inc.’s John Jessup, Henry Luce, & Otto Fuerbringer with presidential candidate Senator John Kennedy and others at the Time Life Building.” The image and caption can be found in several places:

A Look Back At The Early Days Of The Original “Mad Men”

A Tour of the Time & Life Building in the 1960s

Henry Luce, head of the Time-Life publishing giant, was a key player in the CIA’s Operation Mockingbird:

Allen Dulles [CIA Director at relevant times] often interceded with his good friend, the late Henry Luce, founder of Time and Life magazines, who readily allowed certain members of his staff to work for the Agency and agreed to provide jobs and credentials for other CIA operatives who lacked journalistic experience.

 

…Luce, according to CIA officials, made it a regular practice to brief Dulles or other high Agency officials when he returned from his frequent trips abroad. Luce and the men who ran his magazines in the 1950s and 1960s encouraged their foreign correspondents to provide help to the CIA, particularly information that might be useful to the Agency for intelligence purposes or recruiting foreigners.

 

Carl Bernstein
The CIA and the Media

Luce repeatedly used his publications to smear, ridicule, and denigrate L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology.

With almost uncanny insight, Hubbard himself recognized the insidious connections all the way back in 1968, long before Operation Mockingbird and the CIA connections had been exposed to the public. In LRH Executive Directive 63, dated 12 December 1968, he wrote:

It is interesting that “Life” Magazine in the US has been a violent foe of Dianetics and Scn for 18 years.

 

Their connection to the enemy is not yet established.

 

But it certainly exists.

Yes, it certainly did exist. The muckraking started as far back as 24 July 1950, with Time magazine’s “Of Two Minds” article, when Hubbard’s Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health “was steadily climbing the U.S. bestseller lists.” The article began: “A new cult is moldering through the U.S. underbrush,” giving Luce the dubious distinction of being the first CIA mouthpiece to label the wildly unorganized grass-roots popularity of Dianetics at the time a “cult.”

A greater irony is that this disdain for readers of Dianetics as a “cult” came just three months after the CIA had launched its long-running and very well organized mind-control cult under the name Project BLUEBIRD on 20 April 1950, which would metastasize in the dark for decades under shell-game name changes, such as ARTICHOKE and MK-ULTRA.

Given that kind of pedigree and those kinds of one- and two-degree connections for Amos Jessup, it was intriguing to find him at the end of the research trail of stories about the alleged Scientology-Morocco missions. As this series will demonstrate, the stories of the missions, when inspected even casually, seem like plots that Ian Fleming would have dismissed out of hand as being far too unbelievable for James Bond spy fiction.

Don’t miss Part II of this research series: Amos Jessup and the Amazing Moroccan Missions.

 

 

Watergate: The Hoax is available now
at Amazon, iBooks and 
Barnes & Noble.
Order it today!

Rewrite history with the truth!

 

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