Watergate: The Hoax—CENSORED by the Education Forum!

Saturday, 8 October 2016 by

In an absolutely stunning turn of events, we have learned that a major worldwide forum—known, ironically, as the Education Forum—has stealthily censored, by deleting, an excerpt from our landmark book by Ashton Gray, Watergate: The Hoax.

On 14 January 2016, author Ashton Gray had posted an excerpt from Chapter 1, “Invisible Contracts,” in the Watergate section of the forum, which is in the category called Controversial Issues in History. A little over two weeks later, on 31 Mr. Gray got a private message from one of the administrators of the forum, James R. Gordon, suspending Mr. Gray’s posting privileges, claiming that it was “likely legal action may well be taken against” Mr. Gray “by a fellow member”—but with absolutely no reason for any such claim of “legal action,” and no identification of the mysterious “fellow member” of the Education Forum threatening any such legal action.

Less than an hour later, Ashton Gray responded:

James,

Thank you for your message.

The fact that someone has claimed to you that they have a “likely” cause of legal action against me, with no specifics, and that you have communicated that to unspecified “administrators,” and that you have taken action to my detriment as a result, unfortunately makes you a party to whatever arises from this defamation.

I therefore have to respectfully request that you supply to me at your earliest possible opportunity:

1. The name and contact information of the person claiming to have a cause of action.

2. All written communication related to this defamation.

3. The names and contact information of each other person to whom this defamation has been spread.

4. An address for you for possible service of process.

Kind regards,

Ashton

Within only a few hours, James Gordon wrote back to back-peddle, saying that the administrators may have placed Mr. Gray “at a disadvantage,” and that Gordon was going to “take counsel on this whole issue.” Meanwhile, he restored Mr. Gray’s posting privileges—but he refused to tell Mr. Gray the name of the person who had threatened legal action in the first place. All he would say was that the complaint had come to him “in a PM [private message],” adding this curious note: “it should not take you long to work out who it is.” Not long indeed…

Douglas “Ragtop” Caddy and the Mysterious Disappearing Excerpt

Recently one of our researchers went to find the excerpt from Watergate: The Hoax that Mr. Gray had posted to the Education Forum on 14 January 2016 that is about a man named Douglas Caddy. Caddy was the attorney who “gratuitously” (according to the FBI) showed up to represent the Watergate burglars when they were arrested on 17 June 1972. Naturally, Caddy looms large in the book, and the excerpt about him from Chapter 1 contains crucial information, much of it never collected in one place. But when our research went to the Eduction Forum to find it…

The excerpt had disappeared! Someone at the Education Forum CENSORED the excerpt by quietly DELETING IT, and never told Mr. Gray, or anybody at Chalet Books!

This isn’t the act of “educators;” this is the act of dictators and totalitarians! Who are they protecting? What are they trying to hide? You can decide for yourself, because here is the exact excerpt from Watergate: The Hoax that THE EDUCATION FORUM CENSORED:

CIA Eagle Outline Art-4

Douglas “Ragtop” Caddy must have been stone blind to invisible contracts, even though they were flapping all around him, and he seems to have had more than a few of his own. On the morning of the arrests of five men in the Watergate—James McCord, Bernard Barker, Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzales, and Eugenio Martinez—Caddy popped up at the jail like a Jack-in-the-box saying he was there to represent them, and nobody could figure out how he got there or why. The FBI files on Watergate contain no fewer than 10 instances of the following statement or some variation of it, always containing the word “gratuitously”:

Michael Douglas Caddy, also known as Douglas Caddy, is an Attorney at Law having offices at 1250 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C., and is associated with the law firm Gall, Lane, Powell, and Kilcullen. Caddy gratuitously appeared at the Metropolitan Police Department where subjects were taken after being arrested and claimed to represent them. Prior to Caddy’s arrival, none of the subjects made any phone calls which might have precipitated his appearance.25

Perhaps the initial representation of the five Watergate suspects constitutes one of the most invisible contracts of all. Although the FBI reported that Caddy “claimed to represent them” and the Washington Post described Caddy as “one of the attorneys for the five men,” Caddy had no experience at all in criminal cases. He had brought a criminal lawyer named Joseph Rafferty along with him to the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department that day. Rafferty later told the FBI that Caddy had “asked him to defend the five subjects involved in a break-in at the Watergate.” To further cloud the issue, Caddy later was declared in contempt of court for refusing to answer a set of questions before the Watergate grand jury, but the reason he gave was an attorney-client relationship with E. Howard Hunt—not with the original Watergate Five. [More about Caddy, Rafferty, and the events surrounding the arrests is covered in Part IV, “The Break-in That Was.” —Ed.]

Before Caddy gained notoriety as the first attorney associated in the media with the Watergate suspects, he had spent close to four years in the offices of Governor Nelson Rockefeller in New York, from 1962 to 1966. This is the very same Nelson Rockefeller who would become Vice President of the United States under Gerald Ford just a few years later, when Nixon was cut off at the knees by Watergate. It is the same Nelson Rockefeller who later would chair a committee specifically empanelled to investigate “CIA Activities Within the United States,” but who somehow would manage to miss the three Scientology OTs that the CIA had under contract in the United States—and under Rockefeller’s nose—to develop the parapsychology program later called “remote viewing.” Yes, that Nelson Rockefeller.

Caddy technically worked for Nelson Rockefeller’s lieutenant governor, Malcolm Wilson, but they all were in the same townhouse, which was owned by Nelson Rockefeller and housed his office as governor. In 1966 Caddy went from the Rockefeller clan to the General Foods Corporation, and in late 1969 that firm sent him to work in the Washington, D.C., offices of the Robert R. Mullen Company. That company name may sound familiar.

Caddy served at Mullen as public relations liaison for General Foods, and though he worked at the Mullen offices, his contract with Mullen was invisible: “At no time was I ever on the payroll of the Mullen Company. I was exclusively employed by General Foods.”26

Caddy has since “concluded that General Foods knew the Mullen Company was a CIA front and that General Foods cooperated with the cover operation.”27 He has gone so far as to say: “The Mullen Company had been incorporated by the CIA in 1959 and served as a front for the intelligence agency. The Mullen Company offices around the world were in fact operations of the CIA and General Foods was aware of this and a participant in the overall intelligence scheme.”28 Yet Caddy claims that he just had no idea that he was completely surrounded by CIA spooks when he was at Mullen, or that Robert Mullen’s company was a CIA front.

It’s certainly rational to wonder why CIA-savvy General Foods, working with CIA-front company Mullen in furtherance of CIA aims and operations, would send a CIA-ignorant innocent into the D.C. lion’s den. But “Ragtop” Caddy may be the most CIA-involved non-CIA rube ever, at least to hear him tell it—a latter-day Pantagleize who stumbles and bumbles, all unawares, from one CIA connection to another, up to his unplucked eyebrows in dirty doings, but utterly innocent and naive, being used and abused by these unscrupulous covert intelligence operatives that he just can’t seem to get away from.

For instance, in the “late 1950s and early 1960s,” Caddy had “worked closely with” William F. Buckley, Jr.—that’s “former” CIA agent William F. Buckley, Jr., who had been an agent under the direction of E. Howard Hunt in Mexico City during the 1950s. What a cozy little group. But Caddy insists that he “did not know” about Buckley having been a CIA agent until Hunt told him in 1970 at Mullen. Of course, that would mean that Hunt had no problem offhandedly giving up the identity of CIA agents to a casual non-CIA business acquaintance. Naturally.

Caddy’s connection with Buckley purportedly came about because Caddy had been a founding member of the Young Americans for Freedom (YAF), an organization that Buckley championed. One indication of Caddy’s character—a phrase that may ultimately gain infamy as an oxymoron—is embodied in a smash-and-grab related to YAF that author John A. Andrew III has labeled “The Douglas Caddy Affair.”

In early July [1962], Caddy, [William] Cotter, and another individual (“a big guy”) barged into the YAF offices, overpowered the two YAFers on duty, and made off with the general membership list, the general ledger, and a list of four or five thousand financial contributors to YAF. Caddy apparently photocopied them at his Chamber of Commerce offices, returning the originals to YAF a few days later. Robert Bauman threatened Caddy with a felony prosecution, and Caddy turned over the copies to YAF. He was then fired by the Chamber of Commerce.29

It must have been either a matter of Providence or a matter of the Central Intelligence Agency that Caddy got slid over from the Rockefeller offices first to CIA handmaiden General Foods, then got injected directly into the CIA front Mullen Company just months before Hunt got placed there. However either of them got there, Caddy claims that Robert Mullen called both Caddy and Hunt into his office one day after Hunt had been there “a few months.” According to Caddy’s account:

I first met Howard Hunt in 1970 . . . The occasion of our first meeting was Howard’s coming on board as an employee at the Robert Mullen & Company upon his “retiring” from the CIA.

. . . A few months [after] our initial meeting, Robert Mullen called us into his office and surprised us by saying that he desired to retire and wanted to sell the Mullen Company. He then asked if we would be interested in purchasing it.

. . . Then one day Mullen announced out of the blue that he had decided to sell his company to Robert Bennett, a Mormon who was the son of the senior U.S. Senator from Utah. What I came to learn years later was that Mullen, Bennett and Hunt knew something that had been kept from me, namely that the Mullen Company had been incorporated by the CIA in 1959 and served as a front for the intelligence agency. 30

That all sounds quite reasonable—except that in his 1974 autobiography, E. Howard Hunt claims that Robert Mullen talked to him about buying the company in an interview before Hunt left the CIA and took the job at Mullen. Although Caddy is mentioned by Hunt, there is nothing about Caddy having been present at Hunt’s second job interview with Mullen— and of course Caddy wouldn’t have been present:

During a second meeting Mullen told me that he was getting on in years, the company was comfortably established and he was casting about for younger successors to take over the management and direction of the firm. One of Mullen’s accounts was the General Foods Corporation, whose Washington representative, Douglas Caddy, worked out of the Mullen offices. According to Mullen, with Caddy, myself and an as-yet-unselected individual [emphasis added], Mullen would be able to retire, leaving the business in the hands of this successor triumvirate.31

One problem with that is that Hunt had already told a different story under oath to the ill-fated Nedzi Committee, testifying on Thursday, 28 June 1973:

During one of my earlier interviews with Mr. Mullen prior to my retirement from CIA, and again [sic] prior to my being hired by the Mullen Co., Mr. Mullen indicated to me he had been in the public relations business for a number of years, that he was getting on in years himself, that he looked forward to retirement, and he had developed a plan under which he wanted to take in younger blood into the firm. He had in mind three candidates who would form a triumvirate, take over the firm and operate it, and he would be, in effect, a retired emeritus director of the company; he indicated to me a young man there in the office, an attorney from the General Foods Co., Douglas Caddy, would be one; I would be the second; and Bob Bennett, son of the Senator, would be the third [emphasis added].32

Hunt’s use of the phrase “an as-yet-unselected individual” in his autobiography is downright weird when compared to his prior sworn testimony, and to the story told to the FBI by the man that Mullen ultimately sold the company to: CIA-chummy Robert “Bob” Bennett. Bennett told the FBI agents investigating Watergate that Mullen had offered him the opportunity to buy the company long before either Caddy or Hunt had arrived on the scene. He said the offer was made about “four years” before Watergate, which would have made it sometime around June 1968. Bennett had turned the opportunity down at the time, but apparently had held onto an exclusive option from Mullen—another invisible contract—to buy the company. Then in 1970, after Hunt had been hired, Mullen came back to Bennett about buying the firm, according to the FBI report about its interview with Bennett:

Mr. Bennett stated that Mr. Mullen arranged a luncheon meeting approximately [June 1970] to discuss the details of the purchase of the company. Mr. Bennett said that he was surprised when Douglas Caddy and Everette Howard Hunt appeared at the meeting with Mr. Mullen.

Mr. Mullen explained that Douglas Caddy and Everette Howard Hunt had expressed a desire to purchase a portion of the stock of the Robert R. Mullen and Company and he, Mr. Mullen, felt that they should all get together and discuss this issue. Mr. Bennett said that he did discuss this matter with Douglas Caddy and Everette Howard Hunt, but no conclusion was reached at this luncheon meeting.

. . . Bennett stated that subsequent to this meeting with Mullen, Caddy and Hunt, he exercised his original option [emphasis added] for the exclusive purchase of the Robert R. Mullen and Company and completed the negotiations for the purchase of the company with Mr. Mullen.33

No matter how anybody tells it, it’s impossible for anyone with a measurable IQ to conceive of Robert Mullen proposing any sale of his CIA front company to Caddy unless Caddy were fully in on the CIA involvement—as were Mullen, Bennett and Hunt—and unless the CIA had fully approved of such a transaction before the first word was whispered about it. (When Caddy was asked directly about this obvious point in a public forum in 2005, he did what Caddy does so well: he ignored the question.) Even Sarah Silverman isn’t stupid enough to fall for that one. (Okay; maybe she is.)

As Bennett continued his interview with the FBI, he gave a few more insights into Caddy’s “character”:

Mr. Bennett stated that during this period of negotiations for the purchase of the company, both the Robert R. Mullen Company and the General Foods Corporation found Douglas Caddy’s performance to be unacceptable and Mr. Caddy was released from his position [emphasis added] by the General Foods Corporation. Bennett stated that through a contact, Mr. Mullen arranged for Douglas Caddy to obtain a position as an attorney with the law firm Gall, Lane, Powell and Kilcullen, Suite 707, 1250 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., WDC. Mr. Bennett noted that Douglas Caddy had left the Robert R. Mullen and Company before he [Bennett] assumed the duties as President of the company.34

Caddy didn’t see it that way at all:

After meeting Bennett and finding him to be an extremely strange man who exuded duplicity I chose to leave [emphasis added] General Foods and went to work as an attorney with the Washington law firm of Gall, Lane, Powell and Kilcullen.35

And Hunt claimed in his autobiography that “Douglas Caddy resigned [emphasis added] from General Foods and left the Mullen & Company office in favor of practicing law.”

It’s a grand waste of time to attempt to figure out which one was lying, and there’s one simple explanation for all of these contradictions: It’s nothing but a scripted “story” that they all kept trying to tell, but they all were lying. That’s what intelligence operatives do daily, professionally: They lie. Most likely, there never was any other plan than for Caddy and Hunt to link up with each other, and with the CIA operatives Mullen and Bennett. One primary reason is that black intelligence operations in Europe were going to be crucial to Watergate, the hoax [see Part III, The Beginning], and Caddy was crucial to the U.S. side of the fraud, but he needed to be actively practicing law to play his role.

Once “Ragtop” Caddy had motored on down to Gall, Lane, Powell and Kilcullen, he curiously became personal attorney for CIA veteran E. Howard Hunt in 1971, a relationship he would be in right up through his contempt of court conviction. Later chapters will demonstrate that Caddy or Baldwin or Hunt—or all of them—lied about the way Caddy was contacted on the morning of the arrests at the Watergate, and how Bernard Barker factored into the convoluted conflicting stories.

Caddy has stipulated to having met with Hunt and CIA goon-squad leader Bernard Barker in mid June 1971 at the Army-Navy Club in D.C., at a crucial time leading up to Watergate—but Caddy later told the FBI that they’d only had “a very amiable conversation concerning their mutual views on politics.” Of course they did. Yet when Caddy rewrote himself on 6 February 2006, he told it a different way:

My meeting came about by Howard Hunt inviting me to join him for lunch at the Navy Club [sic] in Washington, D.C. When I arrived there, Hunt and Barker were already seated and Hunt made the introductions. I do not recall exactly what we discussed but it most likely was Barker’s role under Hunt in the ill-fated invasion of Cuba that took place under President Kennedy, who later came to believe that he had been misled and misadvised by the CIA on the matter.36

From “I do not recall,” Caddy’s memory came back to him with stunning clarity only a little more than four months after that memory failure episode, because on 15 June 2006 he wrote:

When I arrived Hunt was already there with his guest, Bernard Barker. Hunt made the introductions. The luncheon conversation was almost entirely consumed with Hunt and Barker recounting their involvement in the ill-fated Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba.37

First, the meeting was chit-chat about shared views on politics. Then it was “I do not recall exactly what we discussed.” Then it was “almost consumed” with stories of the Bay of Pigs fiasco—when both Hunt and Barker had been working for the CIA. That is extraordinary if Caddy’s accounting of when the meeting took place is true, because nearly every conversation in D.C. around that time was “consumed” with the topic of The New York Times having just published the Pentagon Papers on 13 June 1971—leaked to them by one Daniel Ellsberg. And only a few months later, E. Howard Hunt and Bernard Barker would be involved in the infamous “break-in” at the offices in Beverly Hills, California, of Dr. Lewis J. Fielding, Ellsberg’s psychiatrist. That ultimately would launch Ellsberg into mythological hero status—with some very material help from the CIA. But according to Caddy, we’re to believe that Hunt invited him to the luncheon so Caddy could sit and listen to Hunt and Barker drone on and on about the Bay of Pigs, never mentioning Ellsberg or the Pentagon Papers. Right-o.

Despite his self-contradictory stories, Caddy has the dubious distinction of being the only person in all the annals of Watergate ever to put Bernard Barker in Washington, D.C., around this crucial time. Neither Hunt nor Barker ever breathed a word of it.

Caddy had another meeting with Hunt in about mid-March of 1972—but this time along with the general counsel for the CIA, Lawrence R. Houston (whose name Caddy misstates, probably intentionally, as “Larry Huston”). This meeting was only about three months before the Watergate arrests, and it is illuminative to consider the CIA’s own biographical sketch of Houston:

The position of General Counsel was established within the CIA in 1947, the same year that President Truman signed into law the National Security Act that created the CIA. The first CIA General Counsel was Lawrence R. Houston, who had served as Assistant General Counsel of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS); General Counsel of its War Department successor organization, the Strategic Services Unit; and General Counsel of the Central Intelligence Group (CIG). Houston was a principal draftsman of the legislative proposal to abolish the CIG and establish the CIA, which was incorporated into the legislation that became the National Security Act.

When the CIG was abolished by the National Security Act of 1947, all CIG personnel were transferred by law to the newly established CIA, where Houston continued to serve as General Counsel. Within the next three years, two other attorneys, Walter Pforzheimer and John S. Warner, joined Houston as Assistant General Counsels. Together all three attorneys helped to draft the legislation that became the CIA Act of 1949, which gave CIA special statutory authorities unique within the federal government.38

This was no CIA file clerk meeting with Caddy and Hunt; this was the architect of the CIA. He, along with Hunt, had been there at its very inception. One former assistant general counsel of the CIA, A. John Radsan, has called Houston “the ultimate intelligence insider.”39 That’s why it’s pointless to trot out here Caddy’s ridiculous “explanation” of what the meeting was about, just as in the case of his ridiculous “explanation” about the meeting with Hunt and Barker. The entire edifice of “Watergate” is built on the quicksand of just such wholly uncorroborated “explanations” of private meetings, all told by proven liars.

The relevant fact is that at the time of the meeting, Caddy was doing “volunteer” work for the Nixon campaign, part of which work just happened to involve reporting to G. Gordon Liddy to perform a number of “legal tasks.”40 Yes: G. Gordon Liddy, Hunt’s co-mastermind of Watergate, the one with the CIA “special clearances.” And just a few weeks later, as of 25 April 1972, Caddy would be doing more “volunteer” work that he says was “under John Dean’s direction” right up until the Watergate arrests.41 That’s the very John Dean who later will hide contents of E. Howard Hunt’s White House safe after the arrests, then give them to Acting Director of the FBI L. Patrick Gray, who will burn them.

“Ragtop” Caddy sure did get around, and the poor little man was just infested with CIA connections that he knew nothing about.

Caddy has said flat-out: “I have never been employed by the CIA or any other intelligence organization.” In the word-worminess of lawyers of Caddy’s ilk, that statement is almost certainly “true,” in one literal sense of not ever being on the payroll. In light of that, it’s worth considering testimony of the third Director of Central Intelligence, Roscoe H. Hillenkoetter, appearing before the Hoey Committee in the 1950s:

Hillenkoetter admitted that the CIA sometimes gave protection to homosexuals who came forward in exchange for their cooperation. “While this agency will never employ a homosexual on its rolls,” he insisted, “it might conceivably be necessary, and in the past has actually been valuable, to use known homosexuals as agents in the field.” The FBI had a similar policy of using and protecting homosexual informers. So while claiming homosexuals threatened national security, government officials also used them to protect it.42

At all times relevant to Watergate—and the parallel complex secret CIA plan to “appropriate” Scientology’s OT Levels—Douglas Caddy’s homosexuality was so under wraps that it led investigative author Jim Hougan to say in his landmark 1984 book, Secret Agenda, that “Caddy was about as conservative as they come, and there was no reason to suspect that he was anything but heterosexual.” Since then, Caddy has “come out,” and Hougan has publically corrected himself. But it also puts new light on something else Hougan said in that same book. General Paul Gaynor had been James McCord’s superior in the CIA as head of the Security Research Staff. According to Hougan:

A lifelong counterintelligence specialist, fascinated by the idea of a “Manchurian candidate,” General Gaynor was separately provided with this information [background checks] so that he might compare the names of new personnel and agents with dossiers in his legendary “fag file.” The file consisted of details concerning more than three hundred thousand Americans, mostly homosexuals, who had been arrested at one time or another for sexual offenses . . . Gaynor worked closely with the deputy chief of the Washington Police Department, Captain Roy E. Blick. According to every account, the late Captain Blick was sexually obsessed. A source for both J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI and the CIA under Allen Dulles and Richard Helms, Captain Blick maintained exhaustive files on the subject of sexual deviance, files that are said to have included the names of every prostitute, madam, pimp, homosexual, pederast, sado-masochist, and most points in between, of whatever nationality, who came to the attention of the police in the country’s capital.

When Douglas “Ragtop” Caddy came to Mullen in late 1969, was he listed in the Blick-Gaynor-McCord-Helms files? Had Caddy ever encountered New York’s “little CIA,” BOSSI, when he was in New York, but then had his record sheep-dipped by someone like John Caulfield or Tony Ulasewicz—the Tweedledee and Tweedledum who worked under the best friend the CIA and Hunt ever had, TweedleDean?

BOSSI alumnus John Caulfield became “a White House liaison with a variety of law enforcement agencies in the federal government” on Tuesday, 8 April 1969,43 mere months before Mr. Caddy came to Washington.

The very next day after Caulfield’s anointment, on Wednesday, 9 April 1969, an attorney in Miami, Florida, filed incorporation papers for a company called Ameritas, Inc., which would lie fallow for years, but would be revived by CIA stooge Bernard Barker in time to play a crucial role in Watergate during Memorial Day Weekend 1972.44

BOSSI alumnus Tony Ulasewicz got his invisible contract with Caulfield and the White House exactly one month after the creation of Ameritas, in the American Airlines VIP Lounge at LaGuardia Airport, on Friday, 9 May 1969.45

Within a few months, Douglas Caddy relocated from New York to D.C., arriving at the Mullen Company offices sometime late “in 1969.”

There was practically a blizzard of other invisible contracts in 1969. In March 1969, House Minority Leader Gerald Ford pulled strings for G. Gordon Liddy and got him appointed as Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury for Enforcement. In that capacity, Liddy got a permit to carry a gun, and met John Dean. He also worked with Egil “Bud” Krogh during his Treasury stint, and, according to the FBI: “Liddy also worked directly with the CIA, had a secure telephone line directly to the CIA, and received CIA communications.”46 Around the same time period as Caddy’s arrival at Mullen, G. Gordon Liddy was granted “special clearances” by the CIA, in December 1969.47

In March 1969 Lieutenant General Robert Cushman—who had roomed in 1950 with E. Howard Hunt—was nominated to be the Deputy Director of CIA. (He will be replaced in 1972, at a crucial time in Watergate, by Vernon Walters, who both Cushman and Hunt had long been connected with.)

Also in March 1969, the U.S. Navy dispatched two ships of the Sixth Fleet to Corfu, Greece, the Fremont and Grand County, where they set up sentry posts around the Scientology flagship Apollo, ultimately resulting in the ship being driven out of Greece and ending up in Morocco—where founder L. Ron Hubbard would later disappear, on or around Memorial Day Weekend 1972.

In June of 1969, Hubbard wrote: “Nelson Rockefeller finances and pushes forward the totalitarian idea of population control by psychiatry, and his foundations try to shove us around. In the news he and his family interests are under heavy attack in South America.”

On 19 June 1969, Carl M. Shoffler was officially released from over four years of military service, during which time he had served in Vietnam, and also had served in the Army Security Agency at Vint Hill Farm Station in Virginia, a top-secret installation of the NSA. Shoffler joined the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, D.C., and later would be the lead arresting officer at the Watergate on 17 June 1972, having lurked around for more than two hours after his shift ended, waiting for the call.

In 1969, Hal Puthoff was still with the NSA, in Naval Intelligence—at least as far as anybody can tell, since Puthoff ain’t telling—and was already worming his way into Scientology toward the secret OT Levels.

In August 1969, a Navy Lieutenant with Top Secret clearances named Bob Woodward had voluntarily extended his service to take a position on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Moorer. That’s the Woodward of “Woodstein” fame who later would feed the world the “Official Story” of Watergate, laying all the blame on “All the President’s Men”—except, of course, the CIA. In Woodward’s work with Moorer, he “reviewed the raw traffic that flowed into and out of the CNO’s office to and from the fleet, the CIA and the NSA, the State Department, and the NSC [National Security Council].”

On the NSC in 1969 was one David Young, serving as special administrative assistant to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger. (Young would soon go on to work with Krogh, Hunt and Liddy in the “White House Plumbers” group, in 1971, after Daniel Ellsberg leaked the Pentagon Papers. Nobody in the White House Plumbers would ever plug a single leak.)

By 29 September 1969, Ingo Swann had become Scientology Clear #2231—and somehow had gotten clearance to register for and complete Scientology’s secret OT Level I.

On Wednesday, 1 October 1969—exactly three years to the day before the CIA would issue its secret contract to seize Hubbard’s OT Levels—Daniel Ellsberg went to the small advertising firm of a friend of his, Linda Sinay, and started the mammoth task of illegally copying the 7,000+ pages of the McNamara Report that had been entrusted to him, later known colloquially as the Pentagon Papers.

In 1969 Eugenio Martinez was put on a regular monthly retainer by the CIA.

Slowly, inexorably, the people who would become the cast of Watergate were being moved into position, almost like pieces on a giant living chessboard being moved by an unseen hand. (It probably would not be productive to carry the analogy far enough to speculate what piece Douglas Caddy might have been.)

25 FBI Report of 21 July 1972, from Acting Director, FBI, to The Attorney General.
26 Douglas Caddy post in the Education Forum, “Questions for Douglas Caddy,” retrieved 20 February 2014, http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=5892#entry52276
27 Ibid.
28 Douglas Caddy post in the Education Forum, “Introduction to St. John Hunt’s Book,” retrieved 20 February 2014, http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=19747#entry263645
29 Andrew III, John A. The Other Side of the Sixties. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1997.
30 Douglas Caddy post in the Education Forum, “Introduction to St. John Hunt’s Book,” retrieved 20 February 2014, http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=19747#entry263645
31 Hunt, E. Howard. Undercover: Memoirs of an American Secret Agent. New York: Berkley Publishing Corporation, 1974.
32 The Special Subcommittee on Intelligence of The Committee on Armed Services, Inquiry Into the Alleged Involvement of The Central Intelligence Agency in the Watergate and Ellsberg Matters, House of Representatives, 94th Congress, H.A.S.C. No. 94-4 (1974)
33 FBI Report of interview conducted 21 June 1972 with Robert F Bennett by SAs Donald E. Stukey, II and John W. Minderman, Washington, D.C., File # WFO 139-166 [handwritten: -205]
34 Ibid.
35 Caddy, Douglas. “Introduction to St. John Hunt’s Book.” The Education Forum—Controversial Issues in History—JFK Assassination Debate. November 30, 2012. Accessed June 15, 2013. http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=19747.
36 Caddy, Douglas. “Questions for Douglas Caddy.” The Education Forum—Controversial Issues in History—JFK Assassination Debate. February 6, 2006. Accessed May 13, 2013. http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?s=4f987276525762e7e31a500f279940e4&showtopic=5892&page=3# entry53760.
37 Caddy, Douglas. “Douglas Caddy, Hunt, Liddy, Mullen, and the CIA.” The Education Forum— Controversial Issues in History—Watergate. June 15, 2006. Accessed May 13, 2013. http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=7079#entry65509.
38 “Offices of CIA—General Counsel—History of the Office.” Central Intelligence Agency. May 22, 2014. Accessed June 29, 2015. https://www.cia.gov/offices-of-cia/general-counsel/agencypage.2007-03- 26.1987163356.html.
39 Radsan, A. John. “Sed Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes: The CIA’s Office of General Counsel?” Journal of National Security Law & Policy 2, no. 201 (2008): 201-255. Accessed 2015. http://jnslp.com/wp- content/uploads/2010/08/01_Radsan-Master-09_11_08.pdf.
40 Caddy, Douglas. “Gay Bashing and Watergate.” Advocate.com, 1 August 2005
41 Caddy, Douglas. “Memoir on Being Original Attorney for the Watergate Seven.” The Education Forum. November 18, 2014. Accessed January 6, 2015.
42 Johnson, David K. The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal Government. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.
43 Presidential Campaign Activities of 1972, Senate Resolution 60, Hearings Before the Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session, Watergate and Related Activities, Phase I: Watergate Investigation, Book 1, 93rd Cong. (1973) (Testimony of John Caulfield)
44 FBI Teletype of 23 June 1972.
45 Ulasewicz, Tony, and Stuart A. McKeever. The President’s Private Eye. Westport, Connecticut: MACSAM Publishing Company, 1990.
46 FBI Report of 17 July 1972 by SAs James W Hoffman and James R. Pledger, Washington, D.C., File # WFO 139-166
47 Testimony of witnesses: hearings before the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, Ninety-third congress, second session, pursuant to H. Res. 803, a resolution authorizing and directing the Committee on the Judiciary to investigate whether sufficient grounds exists for the House of Representatives to exercise its constitutional power to impeach Richard M. Nixon, President of the United States of America, Book III, 93rd Cong. (1974)

CIA Eagle Outline Art-4

Take action now!

Please CONTACT THE EDUCATION FORUM right now. Demand that they stop their unconscionable censorship, and that they restore the excerpt from Watergate: The Hoax that they stealthily hid from the public by deleting it. Meanwhile, find out the truth that the history departments and the Operation Mockingbird government-controlled press are still lying to you about. Get the book that destroys the lies—and that the Education Forum CENSORED!

CIA Eagle Outline Art-4
Ashton Gray’s Watergate: The Hoax shreds the lies and myths about Watergate. It is finally rewriting the history books with the truth. Don’t be left out of this intellectual and historical revolution that rips the veil off of some of the dirtiest secrets in the history of the United States, and exposes the biggest crime against man’s storehouse of knowledge in the history of the world. Buy it, read it, give it to your friends and loved ones. “And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”

Release-DAY-Blitz-Master-Amazon-2NEWCOVERWatergate: The Hoax is available now at Amazon, iBooks and Barnes & Noble. Order it today! Rewrite history with the truth!

Related Posts

Tags

Share This