Part III: The Mysteries of the History-Makers, Morocco 1972

Thursday, 5 November 2015 by

Part III of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the groundbreaking book Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

Monkeys-MoroccoIn 1972, a number of people had entered into Sea Org positions that were very close indeed to L. Ron Hubbard, and some of those people were also very close indeed to the alleged Sea Org missions with King Hassan II’s government of Morocco in 1972. The reasonable expectation was that these history-makers of truly historic events would be open and forthcoming in helping to construct an accurate history of the alleged events they participated in. There simply was no way to expect or prepare for what happened when they were asked straightforward, logical questions about what really happened in Morocco in 1972.

Notable among those in the inner Scientology circle were the “Commodore’s Messengers,” a coterie made up mostly of young ladies who, as the title implies, were entrusted with delivering messages and communications of all kinds, in many forms, to and from the Commodore, L. Ron Hubbard. Four of the history-makers during the alleged Morocco missions were Commodore’s Messengers: Janis Gillham (now Grady), Terri Gillham (now Gamboa), Gale Reisdorf (now Irwin), and Diana “DeDe” Reisdorf. According to our best information and belief, all four of them were working on the Sea Org Flaghip Apollo with Hubbard at relevant times in Morocco during 1972, then subsequently were at the Villa Laure in Tangier, serving on duty with L. Ron Hubbard in shifts, or “watches,” of six hours each, that ran 24 hours a day, seven days a week. [NOTE: The villa in Tangier is called Villa Laura by a number of sources, but Janis Gillham Grady has said it was Villa Laure. —Ed]

Hubbard always had a messenger on duty. Always. His messengers were among the most trusted people in all of Scientology, and they were cleared for handling even his most sensitive communications.

Throughout the entire history of the development of Scientology, Hubbard had been relentless in ensuring that there were adequate written records for everything. He famously wrote, more than once: “If it isn’t written, it isn’t true.”

When it came to Sea Org missions, he was even more explicit and adament, writing the following in Sea Organization Flag Order 2358, 18 February 1970, a fundamental and vital Sea Org policy for any and every Sea Org member:

Missionaires should keep exact notes of their actions, written promptly after the action. They should keep exact records. These are valuable. In studying debriefs, those who use them continually refer to the actual report, not just the MOs (Mission Orders), debrief and summary.

 

…It is not enough for any missionaire to find out for himself. The essence of a mission is to record so somebody else can know.

 

Operations [those managing missions] MUST continually pound this home and demand complete records.

Any questions? Well, you’d almost begin to think that none of the former Sea Org members we talked to—these history-makers who were right there during the alleged missions with the Moroccan government of King Hassan II—ever heard of any such thing. Let’s meet them:

JANIS GILLHAM GRADY, Commodore’s Messenger: She has asserted that L. Ron Hubbard himself personally ordered the alleged missions. For example, she says that Hubbard sat in his office on the Apollo one day in August of 1972 and personally ordered a number of Sea Org members, including Amos Jessup and Peter Warren, to go to Rabat, Morocco, and do “sec checks”—using Scientology E-meters right under the nose of Hassan II—on the Moroccan military men who somehow might have been part of the 16 August 1972 attempted coup against the king. Yet even though her claimed time frame for the alleged missions in Morocco ran for at least four months late in 1972—during which time she purportedly worked directly with Hubbard for six hours every day—she either could not or would not recall or admit to ever seeing one single piece of written communication coming from or going to Hubbard about any of the missions. None. Not one.

TERRI GILLHAM GAMBOA, Commodore’s Messenger: She was cc:ed on many of the questions about the alleged Morocco missions. She never answered any of them. She was asked directly whether she ever saw any communication coming from or going to L. Ron Hubbard about the so-called Postal-Telegraph-Telephone (PTT) mission, supposedly to train Moroccan Muslim postal employees on Hubbard’s study technology, taught in a course called the “Student Hat.” Even though she ostensibly was with Hubbard every day throughout the entire alleged mission, when asked the question all she said was: “No, it didn’t happen on my watch. Sorry can’t help with that one.”

GALE REISDORF IRWIN, Commodore’s Messenger: Refused to answer any questions about the alleged Moroccan missions. Even though she is believed to have been with Hubbard every day at all times relevant to the alleged Moroccan missions of 1972, she said: “Even if things were going on we were NOT privy to them . . . [I] see no reason for me to go on about it even if I knew something.”

DIANA REISDORF, Commodore’s Messenger: Refused to answer any questions about the alleged Moroccan missions. Even though she is believed to have been with Hubbard every day at all times relevant to the alleged Moroccan missions of 1972, she said: “There has been absolutely nothing asked that I can be of help on.”

That’s four out of four Commodore’s Messengers from the relevant time period who either know nothing about any of the day-to-day operations of, and communications about, any of the alleged missions into the heart of King Hassan II’s court, or, if they do know, refuse to answer any questions about Hubbard’s communications to and from the alleged missions.

There’s somebody else who claims to have been very close indeed to L. Ron Hubbard at relevant times:

KENNETH URQUHART, L. Ron Hubbard Personal Communicator: In addition to his messengers, Hubbard had a “personal communicator” who vetted his incoming and outgoing communications traffic. Here’s how Kenneth Urquhart has described his role when Hubbard was onboard the Apollo:

While I was Pers Comm, I sat in an office a few feet from his [Hubbard’s]. I saw him come and go from his office, I heard everything he said in his office (unless he had MSH [Mary Sue Hubbard] in there), I heard all the orders and queries he passed to his messengers. Almost always I was present when he had another in for a briefing, and I took the notes. If for some reason I wasn’t there he would take care to tell me later what was the outcome of the meeting.

 

I was responsible for entry to his office. Anybody other than MSH that sought access to LRH had to come to me. I was responsible for the considerable flow of paper to and from his desk. LRH frequently called me to discuss ship matters, international management matters, internal ship organization matters, technical matters, family matters. In addition to all this, he had me in his office or out on the deck with him to chat.

Urquhart also has said: “Except for GO [Guardian’s Office] matters, just about everything went to LRH’s desk on paper, and through me.”

Any questions? And Hubbard, according to the many varying accounts of the alleged Moroccan missions, had to have been aboard the Apollo for at the least the first part of the alleged mission to train Muslim Moroccan postal employees in study tech, which, according to the “Official Story,” had to have taken place prior to 16 August 1972. Yet when Urquhart was asked about the alleged Moroccan missions, he said: “I have little information about the Sec Checking project or the Post Office project. I barely remember the latter.”

You may think you must have misread that, so here it is again: “I have little information about the Sec Checking project or the Post Office project. I barely remember the latter.” This concept gets even more bizarre in our separate coverage of the “Sec Checking project” but that comes later.

And then there’s another man who it seems should know something about the alleged missions:

JIM DINCALCI, Medical Officer for the Apollo and for L. Ron Hubbard: In the latter months of 1972, during which time the alleged sec-checking missions had to have been going on—if they ever went on—when Hubbard supposedly was residing in Tangier at the Villa Laure, Dincalci says that he was making trips from Lisbon, where the Apollo was at the time, down to Tangier. As he put it, in his inimitable style:

“I was the Flag Medical Officer who had been working with LRH as His [sic] MO also. I had been giveing [sic] him Massages [sic] and vitamin program [sic] andhad [sic] been going down to Maroc as courrier [sic] to give him Massages [sic].”

Actual scanned excerpt from a "debrief" purportedly written by graduate student Jim Dincalci about his 10 months in hiding with L. Ron Hubbard.

Actual scanned excerpt from a “debrief” purportedly written by then-ex-graduate student Jim Dincalci about his 10 months in hiding with L. Ron Hubbard.

And here we thought couriers carried messages, not “Massages,” but perhaps they were massaged messages.

Whatever he carried as a courier, before he joined the Sea Org and came to the Apollo, Dincalci says he had “started training in psychology in graduate school at New York Medical College in 1968.” According to school records, Dincalci was awarded a Bachelor of Science in Pre-Med at Old Dominion College on 6 June 1968, and then attended New York Medical College, Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals, Graduate School of Nursing between 1968-1969, withdrawing from the program, for reasons unknown, on 18 February 1969. Given his pre-med degree, given his statement that his field of graduate study was psychology, and given school records saying he was at the Graduate School of Nursing at New York Medical College, it seems only logical to surmise that his graduate focus was psychiatric nursing.

Another person prominently at New York Medical College (NYMC) at the time, as Professor of Psychiatry and director of the psychiatry department’s Biological-Psychiatry Division, was Dr. Max Fink. Investigative author H. P. Albarelli, Jr., in his book A Secret Order, has identified Fink among a group of “covert contractors with the CIA’s MK/ULTRA and ARTICHOKE projects.” Albarelli says that members of this group “were considered at the time to be the creme-de-la-créme of psychochemical researchers, and all were wittingly under contract with the CIA, U.S. Army, or U.S. Navy to perform extensive research for the government, often using unwitting subjects in highly abusive, sometimes barbaric situations.”

Fink had experimented on human beings in almost every major field of mind manipulation that the CIA tried in its decades-long mania to create a “Manchurian Candidate,” including insulin comas and heavy psychotropic drugs. Fink’s true specialty, though, was electroconvulsive shock—euphemistically known as ECT. CIA documents released under the Freedom of Information Act have described use of electroconvulsive shock in combination with drugs such as imipramine, chlorpromazine, amobarbital, opiates, cannabis, and LSD, all drugs that Fink has described experiments with. Here’s Fink himself in an interview with David Healy on the subject of Fink’s activities at New York Medical College at the time of Dincalci’s attendance there in 1968:

[In 1968] I wrote a grant application to NIMH [National Institute of Mental Health] and asked for funds to compare unilateral vs. bilateral ECT as well as multiple treatments [multiple convulsions] in one session (MMECT) vs. single treatments [single convulsions] in a series. I equipped an EEG laboratory, put an air conditioner in the wall, and hired a nurse from the New York Medical College . . . The work was done between 1968 and 1972.

Around this time period, Fink was recognized as “the principal NIMH grantholder in convulsive” electric shocks, and a leading authority on the subject, which would have qualified him to place high in the CIA hierarchy of MK-ULTRA psychotechnicians.

If any organization in the United States ever stood as an icon of nemesis for L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology, it was NIMH, and if any single act in all of the psychoestablishment’s arsenal stood in direct opposition to everything Scientological, it was electorconvulsive shock.

Out of this unlikely philosophic incubator at New York Medical College, 1968, Jim Dincalci somehow was reborn in 1972 as a Scientologist, who purportedly was personal Medical Officer, confidant, traveling companion, and ultimately even roommate to L. Ron Hubbard—according to Dincalci. In late 1972, while the alleged Scientology sec-checking missions (there are claims of two of them) supposedly were taking place with the Muslim royal intelligence forces of King Hassan II in Rabat, Dincalci says that he was making runs from Lisbon, Portugal, to Tangier, Morocco, to see Hubbard at Villa Laure—at least that’s Dincalci’s story, and he’s sticking to it—so it seems almost inconceivable that he could know nothing about such amazingly daring missions.

Yet Dincalci was sent pages of questions about the alleged “Maroc” missions, and never offered a single word of help or information about any of them. In fact, he ultimately asked that he not be sent any more questions, saying he didn’t find it “fruitful to revisit this time period or spend any more time on conversing about scn [Scientology].”

Well, of course not. We’ll visit more with Mr. Dincalci in a later episode, but for now:

ELIZABETH/LIZ/LIZZIE GABLEHOUSE, a.k.a. ELIZABETH/LIZ/LIZZIE AUSLEY, also known as “Kit,” Sea Org missionaire, Rabat, Morocco: In a number of the more infamous smear books about L. Ron Hubbard, such as Going Clear by Lawrence Wright and Messiah or Madman by Bent Corydon, Liz is named as the Sea Org member who found and established critical connections within King Hassan II’s upper echelon, notably with a man called Colonel Allam, who purportedly gave her and other Sea Org history-makers access to Hassan II’s powerful Defense Minister, Mohamed Oufkir. Amos Jessup (see below) has said: “Throughout all our Morocco dealings up to the coup at least, Colonel Allam was critically important, being the one who introduced us to the security machinery and probably the PTT as well. The key liaisons with Allam were Liz and Sylvia [Calhoun], as I suppose you know.”

Sylvia Calhoun has said, “Liz was the first to meet Col. Allam . . . Liz did keep a diary, however. Her dates should be exact.” However exact Liz’s dates might be, she kept them strictly to herself when we were trying to solicit her willing help; like so many of the other Sea Org history-makers from Morocco, 1972, she never answered a single question about the alleged Morocco missions, though many pages of inquiries were sent to her seeking details. The only thing she said at all was: “I lived in Rabat and opened an office there so was gone during all of that. Wouldn’t Amos himself tell you about it?” But— But— But— Rabat is exactly where the supposed missions and “all of that” purportedly was taking place.  As for Amos Jessup telling about it . . .

AMOS JESSUP, crucial missionaire on all of the alleged Morocco missions: We’ve already been introduced to Amos Jessup in Part I of this series. We will meet up with him again in subsequent individual coverage of each of the alleged missions—but, no, in fact, as it turned out, he wouldn’t tell about it, at least not in any way that was understandable.

ANDRE TABAYOYON, purportedly butler and steward to L. Ron Hubbard at Villa Laure in late 1972: In an affidavit supposedly written by Andre Tabayoyon—which excoriates L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology, and which, according to other legal documents, Tabayoyon didn’t write, but accepted $17,000 to sign his name to—he says that in the Marines he had been trained in “brainwashing and coercive persuasion techniques.” Those happen to be some of the exact “disciplines” that were under the province at the time of CIA’s MK-ULTRA program. Any such training would have been carried out under the aegis of CIA and the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), the twisted sisters of brainwashing and mind control efforts throughout the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s. According to Commodore’s Messenger at-the-time Janis Gillham Grady, Tabayoyon was chosen to drive L. Ron Hubbard in a panic from the Villa Laure in Tangier all the way to the Casablanca airport, about 3.5 hours away, on 29 November 1972, when she says the alleged mission doing sec-checking on Muslim military intelligence officers “blew up.” (There’s a surprise.) When a number of simple, straightforward questions were put to Mr. Tabayoyon about the purported drive through the Moroccan countryside with a fearful L. Ron Hubbard, all he would say is this: “I am not able to answer these questions. Please don’t be angry with me I gave LRH my word.”

Right.

These are the Sea Org history-makers of Morocco, 1972, and beyond. One observer opined that there are at least two ways to be a history-maker: one, live it and tell about it; two, make it up and tell about it—but then refuse to answer any questions about details. Which kind of history-makers are these? With these brief introductions to the Sea Org history-makers of Morocco, this series soon will cover each of the alleged Sea Org missions in Morocco one-by-one. Hopefully, we’ll find out what kind of “history” has been made.

First, though, there is a small matter to be dispensed with: about $12 million cash, in today’s dollars, that was transferred during “the summer of 1972” to the Flagship Apollo from foreign bank accounts. Why? What happened to it? Who did it?

Don’t miss the next installment: Part IV: The Strange Case of the Missing Millions in Morocco.

 

 

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Barnes & Noble.
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Part IV: The Strange Case of the Missing Millions in Morocco

Friday, 6 November 2015 by

Part IV of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the landmark book Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

MorocoMap-CASHPILE-5-INCHES-WIDEAccording to a 1984 ruling by the U.S. Tax Court, sometime in “the summer of 1972,” L. Ron Hubbard purportedly “authorized”—though others from the Apollo actually ordered and carried it out—having the modern equivalent of close to $12 million* in cash taken out of Swiss banks, all at one time, and brought onboard the Scientology Flagship Apollo, which at the time was based in Morocco. Hubbard’s alleged “authorization” is as invisible as his orders for Moroccan missions that this series deals with, but that is what is claimed in the tax court ruling. There was no reason for such a massive move of cash that anyone can find any mention of except for it to just sit there on the ship. That may be the worst usage of that amount of capital ever conceived.

That, though, is the first known instance claiming that Hubbard wanted to have a huge amount of cash on hand.

An analyst familiar with criminal and personality profiling said of this 1972 transaction that it was entirely “inconsistent” with anything known about Hubbard’s methods of handling finance up to that point. Nothing that anybody could find anywhere in the existing record showed anything resembling such extreme behavior or attitude toward finance, and the analyst said that it is unusual for someone to suddenly change such patterns of behavior or attitude at the stage of life that L. Ron Hubbard had reached in 1972.

The analyst went on to say that such a large transfer of money, particularly in cash, was entirely “consistent” with efforts on the part of someone to comply with criminal demands, such as blackmail, extortion, or—more likely for such large amounts—ransom. The analyst added that if it had been a ransom, it would have been for someone that the Scientology organization, or perhaps the Hubbard family, held as being extremely valuable. Still, that amount would not put the ransom in the top 10 highest ransoms ever paid.

The “Official Story” of the Sea Org in Morocco in 1972 seems to insist that this was just crazy old, greedy old Elron satisfying a craven need for money, money, and more money. If that’s true, he was, hands down, the stupidest miser who ever walked, because even the tax court couldn’t account for what that cash was doing just sitting onboard the Apollo. And the tax court apparently overlooked entirely the fact that after Hubbard allegedly “authorized” all this cash to be transferred onboard, he supposedly went to live ashore in Tangier in September of 1972, while the ship sailed away to Portugal for dry dock, carrying millions in cash with it. Then the “Official Story” is that Hubbard fled to the United States in early December of 1972 for 10 months, purportedly leaving those many millions of dollars sitting in a large pile of cash on the ship, collecting no interest, only dust.

Shortly after the transfer of this huge amount of cash to the ship in 1972—probably around the time that L. Ron Hubbard reportedly “moved ashore” to the Villa Laure in Tangier, although no one seems willing to give any definite dates—Jim Dincalci took a trip to New York City. This was not the trip Dincalci claims that he made with Hubbard to New York later in the year, on 4 December 1972. This is an earlier trip Mr. Dincalci took in 1972, apparently without Hubbard, when Mr. Dincalci went “on leave” to New York City.

Of course it’s only coincidence, but 1972 is also the year when Max Fink—who H. P. Albarelli, Jr., has identified as one of the CIA’s top-tier MK/ULTRA shock-and-drug doctors—moved as faculty from the New York Medical College to SUNY of Stony Brook in New York City. In 1968 and 1969, both Dincalci and Fink had been at New York Medical College, where Fink had created a unit for delivering electroconvulsive shock.

Of course it’s also only coincidence, but Dincalci was in New York City “on leave” approximately when Scientology OT VII Ingo Swann had just returned to New York City from the Stanford Research Institute outside San Francisco, where Swann, in conjunction with OT VII Hal Puthoff, had been doing a series of Top Secret controlled experiments with representatives of the CIA’s Office of Technical Services (OTS—cute abbreviation) and Office of Research and Development, starting on August 14 and continuing through August 25, 1972.

In yet another coincidence, it had been during that series of experiments—on 16 August 1972, to be exact—that an attempted assassination of King Hassan II supposedly took place on the other side of the world, back in Morocco (where about $12 million in cash had recently arrived at the Apollo). The Moroccan Minister of Defense, General Mohamed Oufkir, subsequently committed suicide the next day by shooting himself a number of times in his back and in the back of his head. That all happened after Sea Org missionaires Amos Jessup, Peter Warren, and Liz Gablehouse purportedly had been having high-level contacts with factions of King Hassan II’s government of Morocco, including at least one meeting with Oufkir himself.

Tony Ulasewicz, a.k.a. "Mr. Rivers," bag man for CIA-connected Watergate perps.

Tony Ulasewicz, a.k.a. “Mr. Rivers,” bag man who delivered cash drops for the CIA-connected Watergate perps.

Meanwhile, back in the States: Also in New York City during the time when Dincalci went “on leave” there was a man who soon would begin calling himself “Mr. Rivers.” His real name was Tony Ulasewicz. He was a former member of NYPD’s Bureau of Special Service and Investigation (BOSSI), which has been called New York’s “little FBI/CIA,” and he had a little apartment he had set up in New York City for clandestine operations—not unlike the little apartment in Rabat that some sources say Liz Gablehouse, Amos Jessup, and Peter Warren used for their clandestine operations with King Hassan II’s top Muslim intelligence operatives. Ulasewicz was tight with the Watergate CIA perps E. Howard Hunt, G. Gordon Liddy, James McCord, and their gang of Miami goons.

Sometime after or around the time of Dincalci’s visit to New York City, “Mr. Rivers” started delivering large amounts of cash in paper bags to a veteran CIA operative named Dorothy Hunt. He would fly to Washington, D.C., and make the drops of cash in lockers of the Washington National Airport for Mrs. Hunt to pick up.

Mrs. Hunt would take the cash and distribute it to the CIA operatives E. Howard Hunt, G. Gordon Liddy, James McCord, Bernard Barker, Eugenio Martinez, Virgilio Gonzales, and Frank Sturgis. Nobody to this day knows how much cash actually got passed around to the CIA operatives in paper bags. Nobody to this day has confirmed where all of the cash might have come from.

During all of this activity, where was L. Ron Hubbard? According to the “Official Story,” such as it is, he was squirrelled away in his Villa Laure hidey-hole in Tangier, Morocco, beginning at least by 15 September 1972. His whereabouts were purportedly only known to a handful of closes confidants—who, as it happens, include the very Sea Org history-makers of Morocco that this series is covering. They all will tell the sort-of-same sketchy story they want to have told, but have seemed extremely reluctant to answer specific questions about where Hubbard was, when, and what he was doing. [See Part III: The Mysteries of the History-Makers, Morocco 1972. —Ed.]

There’s more to say about this hidey-hole called Villa Laure, which will be covered in Part VIII: Villa Laure—A Moroccan House of Mirrors.  [NOTE: The villa in Tangier is called Villa Laura by a number of sources, but Janis Gillham Grady has said it was Villa Laure. —Ed] For now, there are uncountable questions about an extraordinary amount of cash that was brought to the Apollo in Morocco for unaccountable reasons.

What did all that cash have to do with Hubbard becoming essentially “whereabouts unknown” while the Apollo sailed away to Portugal in October 1972, supposedly carrying all that cash?

Was that much cash actually on the Apollo at the time it went to dry dock in Portugal?

Was there really a 16 August 1972 attack by advanced fighter jets on the passenger plane of Hassan II that he somehow miraculously escaped? Or was there, instead, a very good reason needed to execute Mohamed Oufkir and some of his officers who previously had been in closed-door contact with several of the Sea Org history-makers from the Apollo?

General Mohamed Oufkir

General Mohamed Oufkir lost his trademark glasses from a bullet in the back of his head during his “suicide.”

Had devout Muslims Colonel Allam and General Oufkir ever really been interested in Scientology technology (no matter what it was being called or misrepresented as) and in L. Ron Hubbard’s E-meter, as our Sea Org history-makers of Morocco claim? Or was there some other reason for them having meetings with the Sea Org members from the Apollo, where $12 million in cash had been transferred?

Is it possible, even remotely possible, that the CIA and King Hassan II had many mutual interests—among them being the elimination of a dangerous red-headed infidel spreading a rapidly growing religion, while also removing the one major barrier to the CIA’s intended “appropriation” (read: theft) of Hubbard’s OT Levels? And could $12 million dollars have gone a long way indeed toward realization of such mutual goals?

These questions, of course, are all just “silly,” as Amos Jessup might describe them. What definitely isn’t “silly,” and what definitely happened, is that on Sunday, 1 October 1972—just two weeks after Commodore’s Messenger Janis Gillham Grady claims that Hubbard went to hole up at the Villa Laure—the CIA’s Technical Services Division (TSD) issued to OT VII Hal Puthoff a Top Secret research contract to develop “remote viewing” for military espionage purposes, along with Scientology OTs Ingo Swann and Pat Price. Shortly after that contract was issued, that CIA division changed its name to Office of Technical Services, becoming known as OTS.

And L. Ron Hubbard never, ever, found out about it.

Don’t miss Part V: King Hassan II, Islam, and the Scientology Study Technology.

* The tax court itself couldn’t seem to settle entirely on the 1972 amount that was transferred in cash, saying in one place that it was $2 million, and in another that it was “over $2 million.” Another source talks about $2.1 million having been transferred, and $2.1 million in 1972 dollars translates to $11,998,264.74 in today’s dollars. The tax court discusses other cash aboard the Apollo during the year, but for these purposes we’re leaving it at this single transfer of cash.

 

 

Watergate: The Hoax is available now
at Amazon, iBooks and 
Barnes & Noble.
Order it today!

Rewrite history with the truth!

 

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Part V: King Hassan II, Islam, and the Scientology Study Technology

Friday, 6 November 2015 by

Part V of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the giant exposé of the Deep State, Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

Alice-MadHatter-SMSeveral of the famous (or infamous) muckraking books about L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology have asserted that on the orders of Hubbard, a Sea Org mission was sent into Rabat, the capital of Morocco, sometime during the summer of 1972, to train Muslim Moroccan postal workers on L. Ron Hubbard’s “Student Hat” course. The course consists of Hubbard’s own writings on the technology of study, and, importantly, 10 of his taped lectures called “The Study Tapes.” This tale of Scientology allegedly going postal (pardon the pun) has been made into an important piece of the “Official Story” of what happened with Hubbard and Scientology in Morocco that year.

To compare the stories of such a mission to the stories of the Mad Hatter’s tea party is to deliver a stinging insult to the pristine logic and sensibility of the Mad Hatter and his guests, but we are duty-bound to try, at least, to present and analyze the assertions that exist about L. Ron Hubbard’s Student Hat course somehow being delivered to these Muslim government workers—without them ever knowing that it was by L. Ron Hubbard or was Scientology.

It’s instructive to revisit Jon Atack’s claims about a study course for Morocco’s Postal-Telephone-Telegraph (PTT) employees in his Hubbard hatchet job, A Piece of Blue Sky:

For being persistently late for their Scientology courses, members of the Moroccan Post Office were assigned a condition of “Treason.” To the Moroccans, “Treason,” no matter how much it was word-cleared, meant only one thing: execution. The Post Office officials set themselves against the Scientologists, and won.

Please note that Atack says that these employees of the government of a constitutionally Islamic nation, under a king known throughout Morocco as being a direct descendant of Islam’s Prophet, Mohammad, knew they were on “their Scientology courses,” and were “word-cleared” on Scientology ethics conditions. The Mad Hatter’s tea party already looks appealing.

Amos Jessup, who supposedly was central to the alleged effort to teach these devout Muslim employees of an Islamic nation L. Ron Hubbard’s Scientology study tech (while deceiving them into thinking it wasn’t that at all), said in email, when asked about Atack’s claims, that he “never heard of such a thing.” Jessup went on to say:

The training of PTT personnel was not completed, as I recall, because the half that was doing the [course] were not getting through the Post Office materials for their hats [jobs], because they were studying Student Hat instead. Eventually they became discontented and complained they were falling behind. It was an error, in my opinion, to try to train them on a full Study course.

Well, Jessup claims that he was right there when it was happening, so he shoud know.

Then where could Jon Atack have gotten such a weird idea from? Atack cites Amos Jessup in his book as someone he interviewed, but Atack also has an endnote in his book right next to his claim about the “Treason” assignments. Checking the citation at his endnote, though, it says only: “Interview with witness.”

What witness? Was it maybe a voice in his head? Could it have been the March Hare? (Maybe you could ask Tony Ortega. He fawns all over Jon Atack—who he calls a “historian” rather than calling him a liar—and Ortega has actually called A Piece of Blue Sky “one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology.”)

When Russell Miller did his smear job on Hubbard, Bare-Faced Messiah, he quoted Amos Jessup for his source about the postal employees training mission, giving the same “reason” for the failure of the course as Jessup gave in email, above:

The Operation and Transport Corporation [cover name for the Sea Org] was relentlessly trying to make inroads into Moroccan bureaucracy, undeterred by numerous setbacks. It acquired an inauspicious foothold with a government contract to train post office administrators on the assurance that Scientology techniques would accelerate their training, but the pilot project soon foundered. “We took half the students,” said Amos Jessup, “while the other half were trained in the traditional way. We spent a month trying to teach them certain study techniques but they got so anxious that the others were forging ahead learning post office techniques that they walked out.”

Jon Atack and Russell Miller give us history, their style.

Jon Atack and Russell Miller give us history, their style.

Now there’s Miller, too, claiming that these devout Muslims—employed in the royal service of a king who was a direct descendant of Mohammed, employed in the government of a nation declared by constitution to be an Islamic nation, with Islam as the “state religion”—were studying on the basis that “Scientology techniques would accelerate their training.” And all of this was being done on the direct orders of L. Ron Hubbard. Or so we are led to believe.

And throughout all of this, there sat King Hassan II’s Article 220 of the Moroccan Penal Code, declaring it a criminal act, punishable by up to three years in a Moroccan prison, for “whoever uses means of seduction to shake the belief of a Muslim or to change his religious allegiance.”

Would you like one lump or two with your tea?

In the face of these incomprehensible contradictions, we tried in all good faith to submit sensible questions that would make all of this nonsense make sense. We submitted the questions to Amos Jessup—who was the only person we could find who has ever directly made these claims—and also to his group of friends who were right there with L. Ron Hubbard throughout the period of time in 1972 when this allegedly took place. They are:

  • Janis Grady, nee Janis Gillham, long-time Commodore’s Messenger
  • Terri Gamboa, nee Terri Gillham, formerly Terri Armstrong, long-time Commodore’s Messenger
  • Gale Irwin, nee Gale Reisdorf, long-time Commodore’s Messenger
  • Diana Reisdorf, also known as Dede Reisdorf, long-time Commodore’s Messenger
  • Kenneth Urquhart, long-time Personal Communicator to L. Ron Hubbard (LRH Pers Comm)
  • Jim Dincalci, “medical officer” to L. Ron Hubbard
  • Elizabeth Gablehouse, nee Elizabeth Ausley, also known as Liz Gablehouse or Liz Ausley, a Sea Org member who reportedly was on a mission in Rabat, Morocco, at relevant times conducting public relations with several highly placed officials of Hassan II’s government

Here are the questions we submitted to them with requests for their help:

PTT STUDY-TECH TRAINING MISSION QUESTIONS

1. What official of the government of Morocco approved the training, and what was his position in the government?

2. Did King Hassan II himself authorize it?

3. Who from Scientology/Sea Org (under any guise) negotiated the agreement with the government?

4. Did the government of Morocco pay for the training? If so, how much, and to whom?

5. Did the government of Morocco require a contract for the training? If so, who signed it on behalf of Scientology/Sea Org (under any guise)?

6. If the training wasn’t represented as being Scientology study technology, with the source being L. Ron Hubbard, how was it represented? Put in other words, what was the “shore story” used to close the government on authorizing this training?

7. Was the training done in accordance with the Scientology “What Is a Course” policy? If not, why not, and how was it run?

8. Was the training done on a standard checksheet? If not, why not, and how was it conducted?

9. Who was the course supervisor?

10. Did PTT personnel on the training course listen to the The Study Tapes? If so, how was the translation handled? If not, how were they able to get trained on study tech?

11. Did the PTT personnel on the study-tech training course read “Keeping Scientology Working”? If not, why not?

12. Was LRH as source eradicated from all the materials? If so, did he order that, and how was it accomplished?

13. Was a Scientology abridged dictionary used for Scientology terms? If not, how were Scientology words cleared?

14. The information we have is that the study-tech training mission began after Amos Jessup and Peter Warren had met with General Oufkir and showed him the E-Meter, and during the period of time while they were waiting to hear back from Oufkir about the E-Meter. Of course the coup attempt on 16 August 1972 ended that wait to hear back from Oufkir, but had the study-tech training course already ended at the time of the coup attempt?

15. How long was the wait to hear back from Oufkir? Days? Weeks? Months?

16. How long did the study-tech training course run before it failed? Days? Weeks? Months? [Jessup told Russell Miller that it was “a month” of trying—but that creates its own issues, covered in later articles in the series.]

17. Who was the mission 1st, or I/C, on the study-tech training mission?

18. Where did reports on the progress of the mission go, and in what form? What was the mission communication?

19. Why did the government of Morocco put only half of the PTT trainees on the study-tech course, and approximately how many students were there on the study-tech course?

20. Here is the information we have from Amos about the failure of the study-tech training mission: “The training of PTT personnel was not completed . . . because they were studying Student Hat instead. Eventually they became discontented and complained they were falling behind. It was an error, in my opinion, to try to train them on a full Study course . . .” So far it’s been difficult to work this reason into a narrative without making it seem that neither Hubbard nor anyone in this level of the Moroccan government nor any of the trainees was able to figure out ahead of time that 1 course + 1 course = 2 courses; it does not equal the time needed to do 1 course. How did this revelation—that doing 2 courses would take longer than doing 1 course—come as a surprise to the Moroccans?

There are the 20 questions we asked. And here are the answers we got:

Monkeys-MoroccoNot one single answer to one single question. None.

In fact, L. Ron Hubbard’s own Personal Communicator at the time of the alleged mission, Kenneth Urquhart—who earlier had said that he could “barely remember” the PTT study tech mission—immediately said, upon receiving these questions, that he wanted to be removed from the list of people being sent questions about Hubbard and Morocco. He wanted out. Now. [It soon became a mass evacuation that rivaled the stories of the Sea Org leaving Morocco. See Part VI: Amos Jessup on Training Islamic Intelligence Agents to use a Scientology E-Meter. —Ed]

No wonder he wanted out. About now, you may be looking for something that will allow you to escape from such a surreal landscape of fiction-posing-as-history, and government officials supposedly so stupid they couldn’t figure out that having their postal employees do two courses would take longeAlice-DrinkMe-SMr than having them do one course—so allegedly issued a government contract that on its face would have been a criminal violation of King Hassan’s own Penal Code Article 220.

Just look for a bottle marked “Drink Me,” and maybe it will transport you magically into the next installment of the strange tales of L. Ron Hubbard and Morocco—but don’t count on it being any less surreal. While you’re in transit, keep this in mind: So far as all efforts in research have found, there is not one single scrap of paper or physical evidence of any kind, anywhere in existence, for any of the claims about this alleged mission.

Don’t miss Part VI: Amos Jessup on Training Islamic Intelligence Agents to use a Scientology E-Meter.

 

 

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Part VI: Amos Jessup on Training Islamic Intelligence Agents to use a Scientology E-Meter

Saturday, 7 November 2015 by

Part VI of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the landmark exposé of CIA crimes, Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

LRH-Standee-3-FINAL

Was L. Ron Hubbard actually in on any of this? You decide.

Let’s get this out of the way right up front: According to Lawrence Wright in Going Clear, the so-called Church of Scientology “denies that Scientologists worked with General Oufkir’s men or used the E-Meter to provide security checking for the Moroccan government.” Right.  Of course, that then utterly destroys the “Official Story” for why all Scientologists had to suddenly vacate Morocco in December 1972. It also seems to be the church’s attempt to characterize as bare-faced liars our history-makers of Morocco who have claimed that there were such missions. [That isn’t a fraction of the problems with the Church of Scientology’s version. For more on that, see Part IX: Hubbard Hears a Who and Part X: A Day or Six in Lisbon With Hubbard, Jim Dincalci, and Ken Urquhart. —Ed.]

The biggest problem the “official” church mouthpieces have with making their “denial” about the Morocco missions is that our history-makers in this series were in positions right next to L. Ron Hubbard in Morocco at relevant times in 1972—or so they say. The Commodore’s Messengers in this series, for example, were with him around the clock in six-hour shifts—or so they say. [See Part III: The Mysteries of the History-Makers, Morocco, 1972.]

According to each side of this conflict—our history-makers who were there and with L. Ron Hubbard, versus the mouthpieces of Scientology’s current byzantine corporate structure—the other side is lying. So which side is lying? The claims are diametrically opposed, so somebody has to be lying. Either there were missions providing security checking using E-meters with the Morocco government, or there weren’t any such missions.  Time to get the popcorn, and let’s find out.

Ken Urquhart, long-time LRH Personal Communicator, is one of the people that the so-called church seems to be calling a liar. Here he is now with his contribution to Russell Miller’s Bare-Faced Messiah caricature of Hubbard, claiming to have  first-hand knowledge of the Moroccan E-meter escapade:

He [LRH] had taken some people ashore and was trying to teach the Moroccan security police how to use an E-meter so they could catch traitors. I saw him doing that and saw who he sent out to put on the training team. I didn’t see how it could possibly succeed, you can’t monkey around with the secret police. He was looking for the possibility of looking for some country to welcome him, to keep him secure. He thought if he could get into favour with the secret police he would have the favour of King Hassan. It blew up in everybody’s face. He was trying to teach the police how to find out if somebody had a crime using the E-meter.

Take note of that “some country to welcome him, to keep him secure” talking point. It will come back to haunt us later, but for now, here is long-time Commodore’s Messenger Janis Gillham Grady, with her version of the story—and she has adamantly claimed that she was with L. Ron Hubbard every single day throughout, saying “messagers stood watches around the clock – 6 hrs each”:

The E-Meter training of the secret police was … ongoing while we were living in Tangiers.  While the secret police were being trained on the use of the Emeter, there was a sec check team doing sec checks on the fighter jet pilots to get the list of who was behind the coup.

So she claims that there were two simultaneous missions going on involving E-meters—one training the Islamic secret police to do sec checks, while another was supposedly Sea Org members doing sec checks themselves on the fighter pilots who had taken part in the alleged attempted coup. [For info on the latter, see Part VII: Kaboom! Surprise! Islam and Scientology Don’t Mix. —Ed.] Janis Gillham Grady has also claimed that all of this was being done in coordination with Hassan II’s royal palace. She has also stated emphatically that L. Ron Hubbard personally ordered all of this, right in his office, assigning Amos Jessup and Peter Warren both into service on the alleged mission.

And that brings us to Amos Jessup, who has said that he was the “I/C,” or In-Charge on the alleged mission to train King Hassan II’s highest level Muslim intelligence officers how to use an E-meter to do Scientology “security checking,” or “sec-checking”:

The seccheck [sic] mission was conducted in a large hall rented (I believe) by the Moroccan government for the purpose. It had rows of tables for people to do drills at and study at. … The actual project of training people on e-meters used as security devices did not come into being for some time after the failed coup [16 August 1972], although I cannot say how much time was involved.

There’s so much that Amos Jessup apparently “cannot say” about this alleged mission, but we tried in every way we could to give him a chance to. We’re going to let him have the run of the article in a moment, but first it bears revisiting King Hassan II’s Moroccan Penal Code, specifically Article 220. It provides for a criminal penalty of “imprisonment for a period of between six months and three years and a fine of between 100 and 500 dirhams” for “whoever uses means of seduction to shake the belief of a Muslim or to change his religious allegiance. Such means of seduction are: the exploitation of his weakness or his need for assistance, or by using to such ends educational or health establishments, hostels or orphanages.”

Without further ado, then, here is Amos Jessup, “answering” questions about the alleged surreptious Sea Org mission, purportedly ordered by Hubbard himself, into the very heart of the inner circle of King Hassan II—a direct descendant of Islam’s Prophet, Mohammad—to train the devout Muslim servants of the king on using L. Ron Hubbard’s E-meters:

QUESTION 1. What official of the government of Morocco approved the training of Moroccan military personnel on the E-meter and sec-checking, and what was his position in the government?

AMOS JESSUP: I don’t know. I wasn’t on any of the lines that set up the agreements.

QUESTION 2. Did King Hassan II himself authorize it?

AMOS JESSUP: I believe so but have no hard evidence of having been told so. This may just have been an assumption of mine.

QUESTION 3. Who from Scientology/Sea Org (under any guise) negotiated the agreement with the government for this training mission?

AMOS JESSUP: I suppose Warren (Peter) was involved. Don’t know who else. Bragin [John Bragin] and Eckleberry [Riggs Ecleberry] were both PR guys and may have been involved. Just guessing.

QUESTION 4. Did the government of Morocco pay for the training? If so, how much, and to whom?

AMOS JESSUP: They were supposed to. When we set up the boarding arrangements for the training staff at a mom and pop hotel in Rabat, that was supposed to be the arrangement. I had to deal with a rather upset owner when she realized the bonanza of business was supposed to be paid for by the government, as she seemed to believe the money would be hard to actually receive. [NOTE: We didn’t bother to ask Jessup for any names or documents associated with this gratuitous and irrelevant bit of folderol about “a mom and pop hotel in Rabat,” because we already know that “fiction doesn’t leave a paper trail,” just as there is no paper trail of the government of Morocco ever having paid a dirham to anyone for any of the alleged “missions.” —Ed.]

QUESTION 5. Did the government of Morocco require a contract for the training? If so, who signed it on behalf of Scientology/Sea Org (under any guise)?

AMOS JESSUP: Again, my impression is that there was such a contract, but I did not see one. The legal and PR contacts that initiated the project were not in my field of view, so to speak. [NOTE: It’s just one more no-see-um in a locust-like swarm of no-see-ums surrounding all these claims of Sea Org missions with the government of Morocco. —Ed.]

QUESTION 6. If the training wasn’t represented as being Scientology study technology, with the source being L. Ron Hubbard, how was it represented? Put in other words, what was the “shore story” used to close the government on authorizing this training?

AMOS JESSUP: We were not “Scientology”. This project, for all intents and purposes, was purely a corporate project offered to the Moroccan government by OTC [Operation and Transport Corporation, a cover organization for Scientology operations] as far as I know. [NOTE: The idea that Hassan II and his intelligence forces were ignorant of the fact that OTC and the Apollo were fronts for Scientology is ludicrous. Every American embassy in Morocco and Europe knew, which is amply evidenced in embassy traffic. The CIA knew, and the CIA was all over Hassan II and Morocco like a cheap suit because of important strategic interests that the United States had in Morocco. This may be covered in more detail in later articles in this series, but is covered in the book, Watergate: The Hoax. —Ed.]

QUESTION 7. Was the training done in accordance with the Scientology “What Is a Course” policy? If not, why not, and how was it run?

AMOS JESSUP: Insofar as the immediate technology was concerned, yes. As I recall there were checksheets and checkouts. But none of the garb of the Scn oprganization was in evidence, as far as I recall, in the translated materials, which were in French. [NOTE: And who translated, on the fly, a complete course in Scientology training routines and the E-meter and sec-checking—managing somehow to hide it all as some “secular” course having nothing to do with Scientology or L. Ron Hubbard? How long did it take to create this “course” out of whole cloth, and in French? Did Hubbard approve it all personally? If not, why not? These, of course, are only rhetorical questions that any rational person would want to know—but the fact that they are rational is the reason they will remain rhetorical and unanswered until the end of time. —Ed.]

QUESTION 8. Was the training done on a standard checksheet? If not, why not, and how was it conducted?

AMOS JESSUP: A “standard” checksheet? . . . This was a confidential SO mission, a wild-west play-by-ear operation, not a Scientology org program. There was a checksheet.

QUESTION 9. Who was the course supervisor?

AMOS JESSUP: There were several course sups. One was Lisa Xander. I believe the late Fred Hare [deceased] was one.

QUESTION 10. Did the students use “The Book Introducing the E-Meter”?

AMOS JESSUP: No. See comment above. We did not use C of S [Church of Scientology] materials; we developed custom versions which had no reference to C of S in them. [NOTE: “We” who “developed custom versions”? Perhaps Jessup had a mouse in his pocket. See Hubbard’s own High Crimes and Suppressive Acts list below. —Ed.]

QUESTION 11. Did the students use “E-Meter Essentials”?

AMOS JESSUP: See above for #10. These questions seem naive, compared to the high-tension coping scenario that was actually occurring.

QUESTION 12. Did the students use “E-Meter Drills” and the Preclear Origination Sheet?

AMOS JESSUP: As above. There was (I believe) an Originations sheet. It was not called “Preclear Origination Sheet”.

QUESTION 13. Did the students read “Keeping Scientology Working”? If not, why not?

AMOS JESSUP: Oh, really. There was no place for it in what we were doing. This was not about the subject of Scn. [NOTE: The hell it wasn’t. The Training Routines (TRs) are exclusively Scientology. The use of a Mark V E-meter—which is Hubbard’s own patent—is exclusively Scientology. The entire subject of sec-checking is exclusively Scientology. But in a sense Jessup could be telling an exact truth here: It wasn’t Scientology if it’s all fiction anyway. —Ed.]

QUESTION 14. Was LRH as source eradicated from all the materials? If so, did he order that, and how was it accomplished?

AMOS JESSUP: I believe so. The materials were developed for the course, written in French. [NOTE: “Were developed” by whom? Passive voice is a bottomless pit of evasion and vagueness. —Ed.] Bear in mind you couldn’t just order up French versions of everything, at that time. Especially sanitized ones. [NOTE: “Sanitized”? Did LRH approve them as being “sanitized”? See Scientology High Crimes and Suppressive Acts, below. —Ed.]

QUESTION 15. Was a Scientology abridged dictionary used for Scientology terms? If not, how were Scientology words cleared?

AMOS JESSUP: As I recall, we provided definition sheets for those terms needed.

QUESTION 16. Both the American and British Mark V E-Meters had the following words indelibly printed on them: “HUBBARD ELECTROMETER” followed by “FOR USE IN SCIENTOLOGY.” Here is an image from one of them in which that notice was printed on the blue face, beneath the protective clear plastic:


Mark V E-Meter-NOTICE

Earlier models had the notice printed right on the dial itself. Here is an image of one of those:

Mark V E-Meter-NOTICE-DIAL2

How was that hidden from the students and the Moroccan officials?

AMOS JESSUP: This is an interesting question. Sorry I don’t know the answer, but they were not carrying those labels. [NOTE: You bet that it’s “an interesting question.” And Amos Jessup wants you, dear reader, to believe that Hubbard (or somebody) had Delta Meter or the British E-meter manufacturer retool the entire manufacturing and assembly process to “sanitize” some “dozens” of E-meters, so Hubbard could run a criminal (by King Hassan II’s Article 220 statutes) deception of some of the most highly placed Muslim intelligence officers in the royal court of King Hassan II—a direct descendant of the Islamic Prophet Mohammed—running this “mission” right under the king’s nose, and thereby win the king’s affections, providing a “safe country” for L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology (as long as the king and all the king’s men never, of course, found out that it was Scientology). Do you get all this now? Is Jessup helping you understand this better? —Ed.]

QUESTION 17. Did the hall purportedly supplied by the Moroccan government for this training mission have a mihrab so the students would know which way to bow in order to be facing the Kaaba in Mecca during daily prayers, and was a place set aside for the prayers?

AMOS JESSUP: You underestimate the secularity of those involved, in my opinion; but in any case, I have no idea whether a mihrab was provided, and as far as I know no prayers were provided for. [NOTE: There was no “secularity of those involved.” Morocco is over 99-percent Muslim, and there is no doubt whatsoever that the highest placed security and intelligence officers in Hassan II’s court were devout Muslims indeed. There damn well better have been a mihrab provided and a place for prayers, or the course better have been run so the students could drop everything the moment prayers were called and dash off to the nearest mosque. The reason is not only Article 220 of Hassan II’s Penal Code. That is followed by Article 221, which says: “Whoever wilfully disrupts a religious rite or a religious celebration, or purposely and intentionally causes a disturbance tending to upset its decorum or its dignity, is subject to imprisonment for a period of between six months to three years and a fine of between 100 to 500 dirhams.” And Amos Jessup claims that he was the In-Charge of this mission, but has “no idea whether a mihrab was provided”? Well, there is one obvious answer to why that would be. —Ed.]

QUESTION 18. On the subject of the daily prayers, what did the mission do about this, from “Student’s Guide to Acceptable Behavior”: “Do not engage in any rite, ceremony, practice, exercise, meditation, diet, food therapy or any similar occult, mystical, religious, naturopathic, homeopathic, chiropractic treatment or any other healing or mental therapy while on course without the express permission of the D of T, Case Supervisor and Ethics Officer.”

AMOS JESSUP: Some shortened version of it was provided, I think.

QUESTION 19. According to everything we can make out from the statements about when this E-Meter/sec-check course ran, it had to have been taking place during Ramadan, which in 1972 was from 9 October till 8 November. Given that the students had to fast from sunrise to sunset for that month, what did the mission do about this, from “Student’s Guide to Acceptable Behavior”: “Get sufficient food and sleep.”

AMOS JESSUP: Actually, I am not sure that is true; I recall talking to Allam about the end of Ramadan, before the training began. Memory vague, though and could be wrong.

QUESTION 20. More generally, how did the mission handle the following, from the same policy letter, with the students, all of whom had to have been Muslims: “Adhere completely to the Code of a Scientologist for the duration of the course and behave in a manner becoming to a Scientologist at all times.”

AMOS JESSUP: This question is just silly from the point of view of the context of the project. [NOTE: It’s also “silly” if the entire contorted claim of any such mission ever existing is nothing but pure asinine fiction. —Ed.]

QUESTION 21. Who was the mission 1st, or I/C, on the E-Meter/sec-check training mission?

AMOS JESSUP: IIRC, I was the in-charge of the training operation for the first part of it. The things I remember were scrambling around getting things set up. [NOTE: Must have overlooked that mihrab. Damn. —Ed.]

QUESTION 22. Where did reports on the progress of the mission go, and in what form? What was the mission communication?

AMOS JESSUP: A good question; I suppose there was dispatch communication—handwritten reports. Probably sent to someone at TRC. [Tours Reception Center, a Scientology operations center in Tangier, operated under the cover of Operation and Transport Corporation (OTC).]

QUESTION 23. How did the government of Morocco select the 24 people who were put on the course; why were those people trusted, after the coup attempt, to learn how to sec check others?

AMOS JESSUP: No data.

QUESTION 24. Exactly who were these Moroccan personnel who were receiving the training in E-Meters and sec-checking? Were they actually juniors of Dlimi, who according to a CIA report was head of “the palace intelligence service”? If not, who were they?

AMOS JESSUP: I have assumed that Dlimi approved the list, or wrote it himself, but I do not know this for a fact.

QUESTION 25. What was the TRs course [Training Routines course, the most fundamental Scientology requirements for doing any kind of auditing—or sec checking] that the students did in order to be able to effectively perform a sec-check?

AMOS JESSUP: The basic elements of the TRs were part of the training, but they were done in a secular format. [NOTE: Of course they were. We feel sure that these devout Muslim military men wouldn’t object at all to being told to sit staring directly at each other—in a purely secular way, of course. —Ed.]

QUESTION 26. How was it made possible to train these highly-placed Muslims in this technology without it being “mixing practices”?

AMOS JESSUP: This is another question that looks silly compared to the actual scene, which had nothing to do with making Scientologists or even auditors in the usual sense. It had to do with winning the confidence of the King of Morocco in order to gain a safe base of operations for Hubbard. The technology was a subordinate function to the PR and political gains desired. It was not the raison d’etre. The notion driving the project was that the technology of using an emeter to detect disloyal staff in royal circles could be a highly valuable service to the King and his circle of loyal adherents and would win us (The Sea Organization, under the alias of OTC) a safe base where Hubbard could operate without harassment. [NOTE: Are you getting this clearly, now? As long as King Hassan II never found out that it was Scientology or Hubbard involved with this magnificent, superior “secular” technology, then of course that would mean that Hubbard and Scientology (disguised as somebody and something else) would always have a “safe base” in Morocco. To do what, we’re not sure—but we know it would appear to be secular! Of course, if the king and his intelligence forces ever did find out, then there would be prison sentences for all concerned, but, hey, you can’t make omelets without breaking a few eggs, right? Right? Hello? —Ed.]

QUESTION 27. Both Gerry Armstrong and Janis Gillham Grady have said that Gerry smuggled E-Meters off the ship for this mission. As Gerry Armstrong put it: “I got the assignment one night to smuggle dozens of E-meters off the ship and get them to TRC, which I dutifully did.” He says “dozens of E-meters,” and we have the info that the number of Moroccan military/security personnel under Dlimi who purportedly were being trained by Amos and fellow missionaires was 24. If Dlimi had approved of this training of his staff, and if the mission that Amos was on doing the training had been ordered by LRH, why did the E-Meters have to be smuggled off the ship at all?

AMOS JESSUP: [Didn’t answer.]

QUESTION 28. Did the Moroccan government pay for the E-Meters it was having its personnel trained to use? If not, why not?

AMOS JESSUP: [Didn’t answer.]

QUESTION 29. Was there a contract with the government of Morocco for the dozens of E-Meters? If so, who in the government of Morocco issued it, and who from Scientology/Sea Org (under any guise) executed it?

AMOS JESSUP: [Didn’t answer.]

QUESTION 30. Were these “dozens of E-Meters” returned by the government of Morocco after it had used them to have its personnel trained on them? If so, to whom were they returned, and how?

AMOS JESSUP: [Didn’t answer.]

QUESTION 31. If the government of Morocco had paid for the E-Meters but returned them, was a refund issued?

AMOS JESSUP: [Didn’t answer.]

QUESTION 32. Amos has said: “The seccheck mission was conducted in a large hall rented (I believe) by the Moroccan government for the purpose. It had rows of tables for people to do drills at and study at.” Why did Gerry Armstrong smuggle these “dozens of E-Meters” to TRC [in Tangier], and not to the large hall supplied by the Moroccan government [in Rabat] for the training of its security personnel?

AMOS JESSUP: [Didn’t answer.]

QUESTION 33. Who transported these “dozens of E-Meters” from TRC [in Tangier] to the hall where the Moroccan government wanted them used [in Rabat]? In doing the transport from TRC to the hall, were the meters also “smuggled” on that leg of the trip, and if so, why?

AMOS JESSUP: [Didn’t answer.]

As was the case with so many of our good-faith attempts to create an accurate historical record, not one of the four Commodore’s Messengers who had been right with Hubbard (if he was there) at all relevant times in Morocco answered a single one of the questions above. Neither did Kenneth Urquhart; he had bailed out entirely. Neither did Jim Dincalci. Neither did Elizabeth Ausley-Gablehouse, who supposedly had set up the very connections into Hassan II’s inner circle to begin with.

In light of these claims by Jessup et al., it’s worth taking a moment to consider L. Ron Hubbard’s own “laws” for Scientology, which  contain what Hubbard has described and defined as “High Crimes and Suppressive Acts.” These acts are cause for expulsion from Scientology. Here are some of them:

HIGH CRIMES, SUPPRESSIVE ACTS IN SCIENTOLOGY

  • Any felony . . . against person or property. [See Moroccan Penal Codes 220 and 221, above]
  • Organizing a splinter group to use Scientology data or any part of it to distract people from standard Scientology.
  • Organizing splinter groups to diverge from Scientology practices, still calling it Scientology or calling it something else
  • Calling meetings of . . . the public to deliver Scientology into the hands of unauthorized persons who will suppress it or alter it or who have no reputation for following standard lines and procedures
  • Falsifying records.
  • Falsely attributing or falsely representing oneself or others as source of Scientology or Dianetics technology.
  • Intentional and unauthorized alteration of LRH technology, policy, issues or checksheets.
  • Developing and/or using squirrel processes and checksheets.
  • Employing after 1 Sept. 1970 any checksheet for any course not authorized by myself [L. Ron Hubbard] or the Authority, Verification and Correction Unit International (AVC Int).
  • Acting in any way calculated to lose the technology of Dianetics and Scientology to use or impede its use or shorten its materials or its application.

So who is lying? Were there any such missions or weren’t there?

Is the so-called Church of Scientology lying when it “denies that Scientologists worked with General Oufkir’s men or used the E-Meter to provide security checking for the Moroccan government”? Or are our history-makers lying when they say these missions took place? Why in the world would some of the most trusted people ever in all of Scientology, people who worked right next to L. Ron Hubbard every day in Morocco during 1972, create such a tangled, brackish, and dirty swamp of coordinated lies? What ugly secret would have to exist to cover it over with such toxic fiction?

And if our history-makers are the ones who are lying, as the mouthpieces of the “church” seem to be asserting, then why did the Apollo leave Morocco in October of 1972, and never return? Why did Mary Sue Hubbard suddenly desert an expensive villa on the outskirts of Tangier that she and L. Ron Hubbard had supposedly spent a year decorating and renovating—including building an expensive sound-proof auditing room for LRH? Why did the Sea Org suddenly abandon the Tours Reception Center and all of its holdings and operations throughout all of Morocco, burning or shredding every scrap of evidence of L. Ron Hubbard’s existence there, and take a ferry from Tangier to Portugal, never to return?

Why aren’t the mouthpieces of the church explaining any of that?

There’s one possibility that hasn’t been explored: both sides are lying, and the so-called church’s vapid “shore story” is every bit as toxic a swamp as the stories of the alleged missions with King Hassan II’s security forces. We’ll be exploring that possibility more in upcoming articles in the series.

There’s really nothing more that needs to be said. It only seems fitting to close this with a motto that appears frequently in Watergate: The Hoax: “Fiction doesn’t leave a paper trail.”

Don’t miss Part VII: Kaboom! Surprise—Islam and Scientology Don’t Mix.

 

 

Watergate: The Hoax is available now
at Amazon, iBooks and 
Barnes & Noble.
Order it today!

Rewrite history with the truth!

 

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Part VII: Kaboom! Surprise—Islam and Scientology Don’t Mix

Monday, 9 November 2015 by

Part VII of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the landmark book Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

Oz-lobby-card-1939-CROPPED

From a 1939 lobby card that is in the public domain.

We’re back with the continuing saga of what may be a contestant for the greatest espionage story ever told (if it were true), in which L. Ron Hubbard supposedly sent Sea Org members—cleverly disguised in mufti as representatives of the Operation and Transport Corporation (OTC)—on three missions, right into the royal court of King Hassan II of Morocco, to deliver various aspects of Scientology to the king’s devout Muslim men, but while keeping them ignorant of the fact that it was Scientology or had anything to do with L. Ron Hubbard.

We come now to the mission that purportedly was sent in to deceive the king and his top-tier intelligence operatives into believing that these OTC reps (really Scientology Sea Org members—Shhhhh!) somehow had come into exclusive ownership and extraordinarily adept control of some almost magical electronic devices (Scientology Mark V E-meters that supposedly were cleverly disguised as something else), which devices could peer right into the hearts and souls of “all the king’s men,” in a ritual called “security checking” (or “sec checking), and discover whether they were loyal or disloyal.

James Bond, eat your heart out.

This may come as a disappointment to you, but this mission failed. Well, it didn’t just fail; in the words of long-time Commodore’s Messenger Janis Gillham Grady, it “blew up.” (Perhaps not the best or most politically correct choice of words when discussing something that happened in an Islamic nation, but don’t shoot the messenger—in this sense, meaning us.)

Janis is one of two sisters, daughters of Yvonne Gillham Jentzsch, who the St. Petersburg Times described in a 2009 article about them: “Important in Scientology history, sisters Terri and Janis Gillham . . . were two of the original four ‘messengers’ for L. Ron Hubbard.” Janis says she was right there on duty with Hubbard when this “blow-up” supposedly happened, and she is adament that it happened on 29 November 1972.

She has said that it happened when a Sea Org member named Michael Mauerer had a Muslim Moroccan pilot on one of those E-Meters, and was “sec-checking” him. She also has said that Amos Jessup, who spoke French, was standing right there with Mauerer and the poor pilot, interpreting the sec-check questions and answers, back and forth. (No, we’re not making this up; this is the claim.)

You’ll recall, from Part VI: Amos Jessup on Training Islamic Intelligence Agents to use a Scientology E-Meter, that Jessup claims these meters had somehow been “disguised” to remove this from the front:

Mark V E-Meter-NOTICE

The meters also would have had to have this removed from the lid:

Mark-V-E-Meter-Lid-4in

That’s an inset with the Scientology “S-and-double-triangles” logo, accompanied by the letters “HCO”—which stand for “Hubbard Communications Office.” Because the lid of a Mark V hooks to the front of the meter to hold it up when in use, that would have been staring back, like the red eye of heresy accusation, at any Muslim being “sec checked” with one of these meters by these kafirs—non-believers—Jessup and Mauerer. [See definition and discussion of kafir at Political Islam. ]

But Amos Jessup tells us that the meters used in the alleged secret missions with the Moroccan government had been stripped of all such markings—somehow. He doesn’t say how. Please believe him if you feel the need.

According to Janis Gillham Grady, on Wednesday, 29 November 1972, Amos Jessup and Michael Mauerer were in Rabat, Morocco, together, sec-checking one of the pilots who supposedly had attacked King Hassan II’s plane all the way back back on 16 August 1972—that’s over three months earlier—and on that Wednesday, 29 November 1972,  Janis was at the Villa Laure in Tangier, on watch as a Commodore’s Messenger, right there with L. Ron Hubbard. And then the phone at Villa Laure supposedly rang…

Here is Janis Gillham Grady telling it in her own words, from a series of emailed answers to research questions she was sent for the book Watergate: The Hoax:

While the secret police were being trained on the use of the E-meter, there was a sec check team doing sec checks on the fighter jet pilots to get the list of who was behind the coup.

 

This is the mission that blew sky high when the list was presented to the General heading up the revolution with his name on the list. The list was being given to the General to present to the King [Hassan II]—it never made it there.

 

. . . it was Dlimi that the list was given to.

 

. . . It was the sec checking of the Moroccan fighter pilots that attacked the king’s plane, that created the flight from Morocco, as we had a list of everyone involved in the coup.

 

. . . I will swear up and down that LRH did not leave Tangiers because of the French fraud case.  He left because of the Sec Check team’s screw up. I was right there next to him when it went down.

 

. . . I answered the phone from Rabat at Villa Laure when it all blew up [29 November 1972] and I got LRH to the phone; once he heard what was said, he told me to have his Steward [Andre Tabayoyon] get his bags packed.  Somewhere someone changed this all to the French fraud case, and Russell Miller, Jon Atack, etc. didn’t do their homework properly as there is only [a] handful of us that were there and knew what went down.

 

. . . Actually when Hubbard fled, he left everything behind—no one else left until we had burnt, shredded or packed it over the following week.

 

. . . There is no mention [in Jon Atack’s A Piece of Blue Sky or in Russell Miller’s Bare-Faced Messiah] of the “list” because only Peter Warren, Michael Maurer [sic; Mauerer], Amos [Jessup], myself, LRH and MSH were part of that phone conversation or briefing of it and knew what exactly had happened at that  particular time.

 

Phew! There you have it—not just from an “eyewitness,” but from an active participant. It all sounds so smoothly plausible, doesn’t it? The main difficulty is knowing where to start cataloging the discrepencies.

Let’s start briefly with Jon Atack and Russell Miller, and get their garbage out of the way: the only small problem with Janis Gillham Grady’s apologist excuses for them not mentioning this amazing “list” of coup conspirators is that both Atack and Miller used Amos Jessup as a source. So if Amos Jessup was “part of that phone conversation” and “knew what exactly had happened at that particular time,” as Gillham-Grady asserts, why didn’t he open his particular mouth and give some particular facts about it to those particular muckrakers for their particular pieces of toxic fiction posing as “fact”?

With that nonsense out of the way, let’s get right to Colonel Dlimi. Yes, he was a colonel at the time, not a general, as Gillham-Grady asserts. He didn’t become a general until 1975.

The Director of the CIA in 1972, Richard Helms, issued a Special National Intelligence Estimate on 14 September 1972—about a month after the alleged coup attempt of 16 August 1972 on Hassan II. Called “Prospects for the Moroccan Monarchy,” it was issued during the exact time period when Gillham-Grady, Jessup, et al., claim that these missions were going on:

The intelligence apparatus of the government is likely to absorb a great amount of the King’s attention. It has already failed to alert him of two potentially disastrous blows at the throne and he must try to insure that he is not taken by surprise a third time. His principal intelligence officer is the experienced Colonel Ahmed Dlimi who heads the palace intelligence service.

Yet Gillham-Grady says that it was Dlimi himself who was “heading up the revolution.”

This is odd on too many levels to count. One of them lies in the fact that the CIA—which was all over Morocco because of its strategic value to the United States—never, ever reported one single word about any Sea Org members on a mission directed by L. Ron Hubbard being “all up in there” digging around in King Hassan II’s royal Islamic court with their E-meters. So keep in mind throughout that this is just how good Hubbard and his super-secret-agent Sea Org members must have been—at least, to listen to the tales told by our history-makers of Morocco. They completely deceived the CIA!

Then there are claims made by then-Interior Minister of Morocco, Mohamed Benhima, about the circumstances of the death of Moroccan Defense Minister General Oufkir on the night of 17 August 1972, which was the day after the attempted coup. As Stephen Hughes reports in Morocco Under King Hassan:

Benhima said that when Oufkir arrived at the Skhirat palace at 11 p.m. he was met in an anteroom by General Mawlay Hafid and Colonel Dlimi, and when he realised that the king knew he had masterminded the plot he pulled out a revolver saying, “I know what to expect.” Benhima added, “The two witnesses tried to stop him. In the struggle he fired three shots, one wounding him in the chest, the second I don’t know where, but the third was the most fatal.” He said this was “the truthful and authentic version.”

Well, with all due respect to Interior Minister Benhima, it’s a little difficult to swallow that as “the truthful and authentic version,” because the same book says that another witness reported that “Oufkir had four bullet wounds, three in the back and the fourth having gone through the nape of his neck and out through his left eye, shattering his glasses.”

But whether Oufkir committed suicide or was blown away, he had to have known that Dlimi, as head of the “palace intelligence service,” would be there at the palace when he arrived that night. Oufkir had already had an opportunity all day long on 17 August to expose Dlimi as a co-conspirator (if Oufkir had been involved in any coup atttempt to begin with, which has its own set of problems). And Oufkir even could have used his last breath to condemn Dlimi on the spot in the palace, right to Dlimi’s face—which would have been viewed as Oufkir’s death-rattle truth. But he didn’t.

Ahmed Dlimi, a colonel in 1972, supposedly was the mastermind of a plot to have the plane he was riding on with King Hassan II shot down. We couldn't make this up...

Ahmed Dlimi—a colonel in 1972, and head of King Hassan II’s palace intelligence forces—supposedly, according to our “history makers,” was the mastermind of a plot to have the plane he was riding on with the king shot down. We couldn’t make this up…

And it gets even stranger than that: Dlimi reportedly was on the plane with Hassan II when the king’s royal Boeing plane supposedly was attacked by four advanced fighter jets from the Kenitra Air Force Base. Okay, you probably thought that had to have been a mistake, but here it is again: Colonel Ahmed Dlimi reportedly was on the plane with Hassan II when the king’s royal Boeing plane supposedly was attacked by four advanced fighter jets from the Kenitra Air Force Base.

That’s from historian Dr. Robin Leonard Bidwell, in his Dictionary of Modern Arab History, published by Routledge, which is able to claim for itself that it is “the world’s leading academic publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences.”

It’s a shame that Dr. Bidwell didn’t have a disguised E-Meter at his disposal, because with one, he, like Janis Grady and Amos Jessup, could have made the shocking discovery that Dlimi had been the leader of a plot to shoot down the plane that he was riding in. (Somebody please alert the Darwin Awards, at least for an Honorable Mention.)

Yet Janis Gillham Grady “will swear up and down” that the entire reason that L. Ron Hubbard went fleeing in his shirt tails out of his expensive Villa Laure on 29 November 1972, taking nothing but a hastily thrown-together suitcase, was because he had been told on a telephone that Amos Jessup and Michael Mauerer stupidly had “screwed up” and handed the list of co-conspirators they had uncovered, with Dlimi’s name at very the top, right over to Dlimi—who Jessup claims is the one who had hired them in the first place!

Maybe this has something to do with why Amos Jessup started backpeddling like mad away from the claims of Janis Gillham Grady when we put straight, direct questions to him. But he didn’t backpeddle quite fast enough.

According to Gillham-Grady, Amos Jessup had read her statements about Jessup having been right there at Rabat with Michael Mauerer on 29 November 1972, translating the purported sec-check that allegedly resulted in the “blow-up” with Dlimi. Having read her account, Jessup had not raised a single objection to anything she said in that regard, leaving her statements intact.

Yet when we asked Jessup directly, here’s how his story suddenly went—all of his “escape clauses,” repetitions, and gratuitous unverifiable “details” included here at no extra charge:

It may have been Dlimi who was afraid of being blown by the technology, but I am unclear on that question.

 

. . . By the end of August [sic—not 29 November, as Gillham-Grady claimed], Mike Mauerer and I had sec checked the pilot of one of the planes, under the jurisdiction of Dlimi, I think, and demonstrated the ability to come up with data. It is possible this is what led to the course being approved. [“The course” meaning to supposedly train Islamic intelligence agents on using an E-meter. See Part VI: Amos Jessup on Training Islamic Intelligence Agents to use a Scientology E-Meter.]

 

. . . My memory of Mike Mauerer was after the [16 August 1972] coup when he questioned the pilot of the jet that fired on Hassan, an event at which I believe Dlimi was present as well. What I recall was Mike very patiently teasing out data from the poor sod, who was understandably nervous but trying to show a cooperative attitude. As I recall Mike managed to get his recollection of a Paris phone number that had been in used (the pilot thought) in setting up operations for the coup, and he (Mike) delivered it with some satisfaction to the officers overseeing the attempt. What sticks out about this, it strikes me, is that this was quite soon after the coup. [NOTE: There never has been any indication at all that anyone in Paris ever had anything to do with the planning of the alleged 1972 coup attempt.]

 

. . . The closeness of the dates you have for Peter Warren’s alarming phone call [29 November 1972, according to Janis Gillham Grady] and the departure from TRC [Tours Reception Center, a large property in Tangier that was cover for Sea Org operations] en masse is puzzling to me. It is possible that I was eased off the seccheck mission and returned to TRC earlier than the blowup of the event. I have no first-hand memory of the blowup itself, or of the handing over of lists of suspects found, so I am beginning to think that I might have been yanked before that final phase.

 

. . . Interesting that Colonel Dlimi was also a false-flag agent, as he was participating in supervising the sec check of the poor young pilot who was being grilled after the Oufkir coup, if memory serves.

 

As far as the discrepancy about the blowup and when it occurred . . . I believe I was not on the security mission when it blew up because I had been removed from it, and was probably in Tangiers when it finally fell apart in Rabat.

 

. . . I believe at this point that I was no longer in charge of the Sec Check mission when it blew up, but had probably been recalled to TRC a short while earlier.

 

. . . I think when I left it we were still involved in training, not in actual secchecking [NOTE: but he’s already said the first sec-checking, with Mike Mauerer, happened in late August, before any purported E-meter training], and I do not recall any actual reports of suspects.  So I believe these things occurred after I left the mission, for whatever reason.

Here’s a thought: maybe the “reason” for all these impossibly conflicting claims is because no such “missions” ever took place at all, and “fiction doesn’t leave a paper trail.” [For more on the stupefying “timeline” of this purported “history” about breathtaking secret-agent infiltration into an Islamic monarchy, see Part VIII: The Villa Laure: A Moroccan House of Mirrors. —Ed.]

And maybe it further has something to do with these key precepts of Islam:

Quran 3:28 Believers should not take kafirs as friends in preference to other believers. Those who do this will have none of Allah’s protection and will only have themselves as guards. Allah warns you to fear Him for all will return to Him.

 

Quran 25:55 . . . The kafir is Satan’s ally against Allah.

 

Quran 3:85 No religion other than Islam (submission to the will of God) will be accepted from anyone.

Islam and Scientology do not mix, never have, and never will. Anyone fatuous enough to believe that they ever can is ignorant about both. That’s why King Hassan II had authorized into the Penal Code of Morocco Article 220, making it a crime, punishable by up to three years in prison, for anyone to use “means of seduction to shake the belief of a Muslim or to change his religious allegiance.”

But nothing in any of Janis Gillham Grady’s stories, or in any of Amos Jessup’s stories, explains the one apparent point of all the stories of these alleged Morocco missions: Why did L. Ron Hubbard flee at all? The only glue that attempts to hold any of these stories together—however thin and watery it may be—is the claim that at all relevant times, King Hassan II, and Oufkir, and Dlimi, and “all the king’s men,” never had any idea that it was Scientology or had anything to do with L. Ron Hubbard.

So why would Hubbard run? Did Hubbard really run at all on 29 November 1972? Was Hubbard even there on 29 November 1972—or even as far back as August 1972 when the “sec check” mission allegedly began, or even months earlier, when the purported mission to train Moroccan postal workers supposedly began? Or are all of these brazen stories nothing but a cover-up, an elaborate and pathetically written piece of hopeless spy fiction, with well-scripted “talking points” that all the mouthpieces try to keep straight, but that “blow up” at even gentle, casual inspection?

Let’s revist the brilliant statement by the so-called Church of Scientology mouthpieces on this issue of the sec checks, as reported by Lawrence Wright in Going Clear:

“The church denies that Scientologists worked with General Oufkir’s men or used the E-Meter to provide security checking for the Moroccan government.”

The “church” likely would deny that the cow really jumped over the moon, too, or that L. Ron Hubbard converted to Islam, or that the Cincinnati Reds won the 1939 World Series, but so what? Since when is public relations the art of saying what didn’t occur? That would be, literally, an infinite list. Why is the “church” issuing generalized denials, saying what didn’t occur, but is silent on what actually did occur in Morocco in 1972?

Had enough “history” yet by the history-makers of Morocco?

There is much more to come—if you’re not afraid to step into a very spooky Moroccan villa and look around. Don’t miss Part VIII: The Villa Laure: A Moroccan House of Mirrors.

 

 

Watergate: The Hoax is available now
at Amazon, iBooks and 
Barnes & Noble.
Order it today!

Rewrite history with the truth!

 

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Part VIII: The Villa Laure—A Moroccan House of Mirrors

Friday, 13 November 2015 by

Part VIII of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the groundbreaking book about the Deep State, Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

AbandonAllHopeILLUS-2-MED+FOGIn “The Fall of the House of Usher,” Edgar Allen Poe’s unidentified narrator of that horror classic describes the dense roiling fog surrounding the doomed house on the night of the climax of the story:

The under surfaces of the huge masses of agitated vapour, as well as all terrestrial objects immediately around us, were glowing in the unnatural light of a faintly luminous and distinctly visible gaseous exhalation which hung about and enshrouded the mansion.

 

“You must not—you shall not behold this!” said I, shudderingly, to Usher, as I led him, with a gentle violence, from the window to a seat. “These appearances, which bewilder you, are merely electrical phenomena not uncommon—or it may be that they have their ghastly origin in the rank miasma of the tarn.”

There is an equally dense and rank miasma, a ghastly living fog of vagueness and evasion, surrounding a house that L. Ron Hubbard supposedly lived in on the hills of Tangier, Morocco, in 1971 or 1972 or both (depending on who you talk to): The Villa Laure. [NOTE: The villa in Tangier is called Villa Laura by a number of sources, but a former Commodore’s Messenger at the time, Janis Gillham Grady, has said it was Villa Laure. —Ed]

It is so shrouded in mystery that it is, in a sense, little more than a Fata Morgana—a shimmering mirage that floats in time and space without foundation, without corporeal presence. There are no known photographs of it. Of the people who claim to have been to it or even lived there—including, significantly, some of our Sea Org history-makers in this series—not one has ever supplied an address for it. The few existing descriptions of it are so nondescript they could as well be about almost any house anywhere, on any street, in any nation or town.

This article could be called “The Fall of the House of Hubbard,” because once L. Ron Hubbard entered that house, whatever came out of it bore little resemblance to the L. Ron Hubbard who for more than two decades had commanded the meteoric growth of a 20th century religious philosophy that had reached millions of people around the globe.

Helms-and-Gottlieb

Helms and Gottlieb, the CIA’s madmen of mind control programs who managed the theft of Hubbard’s OT Levels for the U.S. government.

While he purportedly was living in the house, the Central Intelligence Agency “appropriated” (read: stole) his confidential OT Levels by putting under Top Secret contract three OTs—OT VII Hal Puthoff, OT VII Ingo Swann, and OT III Pat Price. The men at the CIA who authorized the several secret contracts, CIA Director Richard Helms and “Old Clubfoot” Sidney Gottlieb, were the very men who had been responsible for every atrocity committed by CIA and its leashed psychiatrists under the CIA’s mind control operations such as BLUEBIRD, ARTICHOKE, and MK-ULTRA. L. Ron Hubbard never found out about the CIA’s theft of his OT Levels. If he had, there would have been hell to pay, because he had expressly forbidden any such groups ever having access to the upper levels of Scientology, and those levels were his copyrighted works.

Within just a few years of the stay at the Villa Laure, Hubbard’s wife, Mary Sue, would find herself charged with felonies against the U.S. government—the very same government that had stolen the OT Levels—and would go to prison. Even though she had been The Guardian at all relevant times throughout 1971 and 1972, had charge of all government matters related to Scientology, and was the custodian of the copyrights and trademarks, she, too, never found out that the CIA had stolen the OT Levels while she was living at Villa Laure.

An odd letter was discovered recently in the papers of Ingo Swann on a research trip to the University of West Georgia, where they were donated. It is dated 21 March 1971, to Yvonne Gillham, then the Executive Director of Scientology’s Celebrity Center in Los Angeles. Swann was OT III at the time, and was writing from his apartment in New York City:

I am nearly ready to move into my loft. I signed $2,000 worth of contracts [$11,799 in 2015 dollars], and that publisher has given me an option, depending on the results of these first contracts, for $24,000 worth of contracts [$141,595 in 2015 dollars]. All this in less than a year!

Ingo Swann claimed he had received money from a "publisher" that most likely was the CIA

Ingo Swann claimed he had received money from a “publisher” that most likely was the CIA.

The reason it is so odd is that Ingo Swann did not write any books at all for a “publisher” over the next year. He never wrote any “books” at all until at least five years later, having one published in 1977. He did, though, enter into Top Secret contracts during 1971 and 1972 with the CIA for expriments in telekinesis and out-of-body perception. The ponderous weight of evidence we have militates toward a conclusion that the “publisher” Swann claims in his 21 March 1971 letter to Yvonne Gillham was no publisher at all, but the CIA. Meanwhile, on the other side of the world, in Morocco …

Time, time, time, see what’s become of me

To attempt to locate L. Ron Hubbard in time at the Villa Laure is to wander in a dense fog, only to come upon a house of mirrors where every reflection is false, broken, or distorted—and at the end of the mirror maze is a screaming surprise that is as shocking to behold as the bloodied and enshrouded lady Madeline of Usher.

The accounts of the Villa Laure create a nearly impenetrable fog of vagueness, evasiveness, and outright lies.

Speaking of which, Gerry Armstrong is the source—such as he is—for the earliest date given by anyone for the acquisition of the Villa Laure. If you’ve been following the series, you’ll remember Armstrong: he’s the one who claims that he smuggled “dozens of E-meters off the ship” to be used in training Islamic intelligence personnel how to use them. Amos Jessup now insists that somehow these meters had been stripped of all markings tying them to Hubbard and Scientology, but Gerry Armstrong never got around to that crucial detail. Occam’s Razor suggests that the reason Armstrong never mentioned it is because the entire story is nothing but fiction. [See Part VI: Amos Jessup on Training Islamic Intelligence Agents to use a Scientology E-Meter. —Ed.]

In a posting in the Usenet newgroup alt.religion.scientology on 24 February 1999, Armstrong claimed that as of April 1971, in Tangier, he had been storing the Hubbards’ cars “at a property Hubbard had purchased somewhere in greater Tangier,” which Armstrong says “became known as TRC, officially ‘Tours Reception Center.'”

We’re only quoting Armstrong’s mention of TRC here because of the relationship Armstrong gives between its purchase and the acquiring of the Villa Laure. If anyone ever gave Amos Jessup a run for his money on use of weasel words, it’s Armstrong, but he goes on to say:

Around the time that the TRC property was purchased Hubbard also acquired (I think by purchase, but I can’t say definitely) a home for his residence in Tangiers. It was a very nice house, called Villa Laure (sp?) I think, in a very nice neighborhood a drive from TRC. Andre Tabayoyon would have a better memory of Hubbard’s Tangiers home as I was only there a few times.

 

. . . I stayed the ‘ship’s driver’ of the Fiat, so got to drive crew and gear to the TRC and Villa Laure properties whenever the Apollo was in Tangiers.

Armstrong repeated a somewhat twisty version of this same story under oath on 10 May 1984, in Church of Scientology of California vs. Gerald Armstrong, Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Los Angeles, No. C 420153:

GERRY ARMSTRONG: Sometime in mid-April—

QUESTION: This is what year, now?

GERRY ARMSTRONG: 1971. Sometime in mid-April we took off the ship Hubbard’s cars because we were taking them to a villa [Villa Laure] which he had in Tangier at that time. So we took them off the ship.

So in one version Armstrong says he was storing the Hubbards’ cars at the TRC property, and then he claims under oath that they were taken to Villa Laure—further indication that the Hubbards were occupying Villa Laure by then—but in both versions he says it was April 1971. One thing that seems inarguable in Armstrong’s accounts: he was one of the small group of “chosen few” who had access to the Villa Laure.

If Armstrong was “driving crew and gear” to Villa Laure “whenever the Apollo was in Tangier” after April 1971, and if Armstrong took L. Ron Hubbard’s cars “to a villa which he had in Tangier at that time,” it would seem to be because the Hubbards were using the property by April 1971. The reason it can only “seem to be” that way is because other “historians” we will soon encounter in this fog essentially brand Armstrong as a liar on this point, and because of the careful ambiguity of Armstrong’s story; he never comes out and says declaratively that the Hubbards were there as of April 1971. Welcome to the “rank miasma.” Watch your step.

Speaking of a rank miasma, let’s consult Jon Atack—the man who Tony Ortega calls a “historian” rather than calling him a liar. Ortega has hailed Atack’s book, A Piece of Blue Sky, as “one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology,” so surely it’s going to tell us when L. Ron Hubbard moved into the Villa Laure. Atack’s book claims the second-earliest date of all sources for the event—but in a way that only makes the fog deepen.

Separated at birth? Armstrong and Atack, masterful equivocation.

Separated at birth? Armstrong and Atack, masterful equivocation.

Discussing “the villa in Morocco,” Atack says simply: “The Hubbards moved ashore.” Next to that statement, he has an endnote number. “Endnote” is a fitting description, because tracking down the endnote, you will come to this garbled dead end:

“Sea Org Orders of the Day (‘OODs’), 7 June 1971; GA 15, pp.2482-4 & 17, pp. 2847-9.”

That would seem to imply heavily that the Hubbards moved to the Villa Laure in Tangier by or around early June 1971, but it is an incomprehensible citation by any standards. That alone is a wall sufficient to stop many people, but there are several other reasons it is a fog-enshrouded dead end. It is citing a limited-issue publication—Sea Org Orders of the Day (OODS)—that would have been mimeographed and issued on the Flagship Apollo on that date, 7 June 1971, but few readers would have any chance of accessing any surviving copies.

The most garbled part of his endnote “citation” seems to indicate that the document might be found among a collection of documents from one of the bizarre lawsuits of Gerry Armstrong; that’s the “GA” part. We already have Armstrong’s contribution to the fog, but Atack’s “GA” pointer is its own foggy dead end, because any such collections of documents were not available to the public when A Piece of Blue Sky was published, and apparently still aren’t.

Atack seems to be indicating with his dead-end endnote that the OODS of 7 June 1971, if found, would say that the Hubbards moved ashore on that date—but that’s just one more of Atack’s unconscionable whole-cloth fictions that he foists off on unsuspecting readers as “history.”

Jon Atack's "citation" is a dead end that drops a reader off a cliff.

Jon Atack’s “citation” is a dead end that drops a reader off a cliff.

We managed to get a copy of the OODs from that date, supplied by Janis Gillham Grady, and there isn’t a word in it that says anything about the Hubbards moving ashore, or about the Villa Laure. As a “historian,” Atack is amazing at making it up as he goes.

STRANGE INTERLUDE: Meanwhile, back in the United States: June 1971 is one of a number of conflicting dates that Ingo Swann has given for an experiment in New York City, using special film that Swann says in a letter “is sold only to the CIA, etc.” Swann has said the he was able to produce a small glowing ball above his head in four shots taken from different angles.

Meanwhile, back in Morocco: Bent Corydon, in his smear job on Hubbard and Scientology called Messiah or Madman, places the Hubbards’ occupation of Villa Laure roughly at about November of 1971—though with all the obligatory vagueness that seems always to surround this house of mystery. Corydon was so craven on this subject that he put his claims into the virtual mouth of a “witness” that so far nobody can determine any record of having ever existed at all, a mouthpiece who is as elusive in the Moroccan story as a wispy ghost appearing and disappearing in this fog surrounding Villa Laure. Corydon floats this “witness” out in his book with the pseudonym of “Elena Lorrel”:

LRH and MSH had bought a Villa on a beautiful estate in Morocco near Tangiers. During that following year they lived there relatively peacefully, while the ship sailed mainly in the East Atlantic between the ports of Morocco and Portugal and Spain, passing through such ports as Lisbon, Tangiers, Madeira and the ports of the Canary Islands. In 1972, they were still living in the villa while the ship was in dry dock in Lisbon for repairs.

The language saying that the Hubbards lived there during “that following year” would roughly indicate November of 1971 as a date of occupancy by the Hubbards at Villa Laure, because Janis Gillham Grady swears that L. Ron Hubbard fled Villa Laure about a year later, on 29 November 1972, which was a little over a month after the Apollo entered dry dock on 19 October 1972. So Corydon and the ghostly “Elena Lorrel” foggily put the Hubbards in the villa by around November 1971.

Note that “Elena Lorrel” claims that the Hubbards bought Villa Laure.

Lawrence Wright, in his smear book Going Clear, seems vaguely, in his own dense fog, to affirm that same kind of generalized time frame, saying that “Hubbard . . . and Mary Sue rented a villa in Tangier,” then saying: “For most of the next year, Kit [Liz Ausley-Gablehouse] lived in Rabat, reporting to the Apollo every couple of months.”

But notice that Wright claims that the Hubbards rented Villa Laure, not that they bought it.

STRANGE INTERLUDE: By November of 1971, Ingo Swann was already working under contract with CIA contractor Cleve Backster, doing experiments in which Swann repeatedly demonstrated an ability to remotely affect pieces of graphite, as later written up in Backsters paper, “Psychokinetic Effects on Small Samples of Graphite.” Swann says that around this time he also had been having clandestine meetings with intelligence agents, “at bars and pizza parlors,” in Washington, D.C., discussing the possibilities of “psychic warfare.”

CIA contractor Backster ripped off Hubbard's experiments on sentience in plants, then was instrumental in the CIA theft of the OT Levels.

CIA contractor Backster ripped off Hubbard’s experiments on sentience in plants, then was instrumental in the CIA theft of the OT Levels.

Meanwhile, back in Morocco: Do you feel lost in this fog yet? Do you think that this much confusion and vagueness and contradiction about dates and terms of occupancy by L. Ron Hubbard of a villa in Tangier is accidental? There’s no turning back now. You must keep going forward, as the fog gets thicker and more noxious, until we reach the end of this quest—and the screaming bloody surprise that awaits there.

The next earliest time period in which the Villa Laure seems to loom darkly up out of the mists comes again from Armstrong’s maunderings in his Usenet posting. He practically ties himself in knots trying to avoid giving anything definitive, but by a careful parsing of his weasel words, it develops that he seems to be saying that the Hubbards were ashore at the Villa Laure around March 1972:

After Madeira, I believe the ship sailed to mainland Portugal and stayed in Lisbon and Setubal in January and February, 1972. Then back to Morocco. [NOTE: That would be “back to Morocco” around March 1972 —Ed.]

 

. . . During this period of time a series of PR missions were fired to gain some sort of foothold with the Moroccan government. Hubbard used the term “PR Area Control.” These missions were beyond what OTC did with its own ship business management PR, and were “necessitated” by the TRC beachhead and Hubbard’s beginning to live ashore at Villa Laure.

If you’ve read the series this far, you’ll know how asinine a claim this is about missions to gain a “foothold with the Moroccan government,” but Armstrong is a major mouthpiece for this “Official Story” of what supposedly happened to L. Ron Hubbard in Morocco, and has been heavily connected to several of our “history-makers of Morocco” coverered in the series. The only point in quoting him is to make record of his claim that the Hubbards were already living ashore at the Villa Laure in Tangier as of about March 1972. He avoids the issue of whether they were renting or buying altogether.

Armstrong’s associate, former sister-in-law, and former Commodore’s Messenger Janis Gillham Grady seems to somewhat corroborate Armstrong—but with her own misty fogginess of time. In a phone interview she said that the Hubbards had bought, not rented, Villa Laura, but she would only say that it was sometime early in the year 1972. We only can assume that March qualifies as “early.” She was quite insistent that the Hubbards had bought the villa, going so far as to say that they had done major renovations, such as building a separate soundproof auditing room for Hubbard. She has experience in real estate, so we had to assume she knew what she was talking about.

And now we find ourselves staring into a portal, a dark open doorway inviting us to enter, beckoning us inside, into the Moroccan house of mirrors called Villa Laure itself.

At the moment we dare to enter, there is Jon Atack again, reflected in a dusty mirror, and behind him in his reflection is merely A Piece of Blue Sky. He points to another distorted piece of glass, and we see a ghostly reflected image of L. Ron Hubbard himself, sitting at a desk, writing: “From his villa in Morocco, in March 1972, the Commodore explained his twelve point ‘Governing Policy’ for finance.” The Scientology policy letter that Atack then selectively quotes from is named “Income Flows and Pools, Principles of Money Management,” and it is dated 9 March 1972. How does Atack know that L. Ron Hubbard wrote that at the Villa Laure? He doesn’t bother to say.

The reflection fades and morphs into a reflection of Russell Miller, holding up his smear book on Hubbard and Scientology—Bare-Faced Messiah—gesturing at another reflection in a cracked mirror, this time of Mary Sue Hubbard inside the villa:

Towards the end of March . . . The Apollo was docked in Tangier . . . and Mary Sue was busy supervising the decoration and furnishing of a split-level modern house, the Villa Laura [sic: Villa Laure], on a hillside in the suburbs of Tangier. The Hubbards planned to move ashore while the ship was put into dry dock for a re-fit and Mary Sue was looking forward to it.

There’s March 1972 again. But dry dock? Dry dock for the Apollo in Lisbon wouldn’t come for over six months—on 19 October 1972, according to Norman Starkey, who was Captain of the Apollo. And we’ve already been “told,” in foggy terms, that the Hubbards were using Villa Laure long before this, so why is Mary Sue only now “supervising the decoration and furnishing” of the place? As far as the story of the Hubbards only planning to live there while the ship was in dry dock, more on that’s coming up at the blood-curdling end of this quest.

Another step forward into the dark and dank villa brings us face-to-face with another spooky reflection—and in this case, “spooky” is used advisedly. It is a man named Chris Owen, a “former” intelligence agent of the United Kingdom. In a curious coincidence, Owen republished Russell Miller’s Bare-Faced Messiah on the Internet, and has been heavily connected to Gerry Armstrong and other members of our little clique of history-makers of Morocco. To demonstrate his probity and unbiased sense of fair play, Mr. Owen wrote an introduction to his Web-published version of Miller’s book in which he describes L. Ron Hubbard as “a pathological liar, a fraud consumed by greed and paranoia who sucked literally millions of people into an extraordinary fantasy world.”

It’s fitting that Chris Owen has brought our attention to pathological liars; Owen has made something of a career for himself out of writing his own hatchet jobs on Hubbard, chopping him into bite-sized pieces like a latter-day Lizzie Borden, and in one of them, Owen makes this assertive claim:

In the spring and summer of 1972, L. Ron Hubbard and his family were living in the luxurious Villa Laura [sic: Villa Laure] in Tangier, Morocco, while his Sea Org flagship “Apollo” was undergoing a refit.

We couldn’t comment on the pathology involved, but Chris Owen certainly is a liar in claiming that the Apollo was undergoing a refit in “the spring and summer of 1972;” it didn’t go to dry dock in Lisbon until 19 October 1972, and it was only there for four days, coming out of dry dock on 23 October 1972. This crazy-house maze of distorted mirrors telescopes time, compacts months into minutes, moves people and events around in a kaliedoscopic sort of insanity all over the time stream, and does all it can to hide any concrete information about when L. Ron Hubbard was effectively out of sight and in relative isolation at the Villa Laure.

Where were Hunt, McCord, and Liddy over Memorial Day weekend 1972? They were not where they have "confessed" to being.

Where were Hunt, McCord, and Liddy over Memorial Day weekend 1972? They were not where they have “confessed” to being.

In the book Watergate: The Hoax we’ve already encountered a similar 1972 house of mirrors: the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C., over Memorial Day weekend that year—26, 27, and 28 May 1972. That’s when seven CIA operatives claim they were involved in two failed attempted break-ins, and then a “successful” break-in, of Democratic National Committee headquarters there. The book proves beyond any reasonable doubt that there was no break-in at all that weekend. There were no “bugs” planted in the Watergate. There were no subsequent “logs” of eavesdropped convesations. Whatever they were doing that long weekend, the main perps—E. Howard Hunt, G. Gordon Liddy, and James McCord—were nowhere near the Watergate building. They likely were not even in the United States. Is it possible that they were in Morocco, taking care of some Top Secret CIA business with King Hassan II and his Minister of Defense General Mohamed Oufkir—who, through Colonel Allam, had been having meetings with some of our history-makers of Morocco, such as Liz Ausley-Gablehouse and Amos Jessup?

STRANGE INTERLUDE: On Monday, 29 May 1972—Memorial Day—OT VII Ingo Swann placed a phone call from New York City to OT VII Hal Puthoff at the Stanford Research Institue (SRI) in California, and arranged to fly out to SRI, where Puthoff and Swann would soon be joined by several representatives of the CIA’s Office of Technical Services and Office of Research and Development for a series of contracted experiments, leading to the CIA’s later long-term contract, on 1 October 1972, with Puthoff, Swann, and OT III Pat Price.

Hal Puthoff and Ingo Swann both had Top Secret clearances before entering Scientology.

Hal Puthoff and Ingo Swann both had Top Secret clearances before entering Scientology—then after doing the OT Levels they secretly climbed into bed with the CIA.

Meanwhile, back in Morocco: And where was L. Ron Hubbard that end-of-May weekend in 1972? Was he at the Villa Laure—which for all intents and purposes would have put him out of sight of and out of direct touch with all but a small handful of Sea Org members, such as Andre Tabayoyon, Gerry Armstrong, and our several close-mouthed Commodore’s Messengers? According to Chris Owen, Hubbard must have been hidden away at the Villa Laure in late May 1972. Owen seems to be conjuring up another reflected ghostly image of L. Ron Hubbard there at the Villa Laure, this time with the microphone of a dictaphone machine:

Now that he [Hubbard] had time on his hands he set about recording a taped autobiography. This was transcribed and on 6 June 1972 was sent to David Gaiman of the Guardian’s Office World Wide at Saint Hill Manor, East Grinstead in England. However, it was never published and never copyrighted. It only came to light 12 years later in the trial of Gerry Armstrong, Hubbard’s former official biographer, when it was released as evidence.

That was a little terrifying, seeing the grimacing reflection of Gerry Armstrong suddenly pop up in another distorted mirror, but the important reflection in this bizarre haunted house of mirrors is that Chris Owen claims to know—somehow—that by 6 June 1972, L. Ron Hubbard, sitting in the isolation of Villa Laure with “time on his hands,” had arranged to have created a typed “transcript” of an autobiography that much later would be “discovered” by Gerry Armstrong, and subsequently be used to smear Hubbard in every conceivable way. Who transcribed it for Hubbard? Owen doesn’t say. It was probably just another reflection in a twisted, wavy mirror.

But we have Chris Owen to thank for an affirmation from a “former” intelligence agent that L. Ron Hubbard was, indeed, at the Villa Laura in Tangier, Morocco, over that Memorial Day weekend—26, 27, and 28 May 1972—supposedly tape recording an “autobiography.”

STRANGE INTERLUDE: It was around this time, in “the summer of 1972,” that the U.S. Tax Court says that L. Ron Hubbard “authorized” approximately $12 million cash (in today’s dollars) to be transferred from Swiss bank accounts onto the Apollo. Why would he want all that cash brought to the Apollo—especially if he was ashore at the Villa Laure? Nobody knows, or if they know, they won’t say. Was Hubbard actually involved in this huge transfer of cash? Nobody has ever proved that he was. Could it have been some kind of pay-off, perhaps to Moroccan officials? Could it have been a ransom? Nobody knows. Supposedly it just sat there in a pile on the Apollo. [See Part IV: The Strange Case of the Missing Millions in Morocco. —Ed.]

And we have come to the end of the maze of mirrors. All that is left in this tour of the Moroccan House of Hubbard is a large set of frightening dark double doors, hung in a gothic archway with rusted hinges and massive rivets. It stands silently, imposingly before us, hiding something, we know not what.

Edgar Allen Poe wrote this at the climax of “The Fall of the House of Usher,” describing the sudden appearance of lady Madeline of Usher, who had been entombed alive:

The huge antique pannels to which the speaker pointed, threw slowly back, upon the instant, their ponderous and ebony jaws. It was the work of the rushing gust — but then without those doors there did stand the lofty and enshrouded figure of the lady Madeline of Usher. There was blood upon her white robes, and the evidence of some bitter struggle upon every portion of her emaciated frame. For a moment she remained trembling and reeling to and fro upon the threshold—then, with a low moaning cry, fell heavily inward upon the person of her brother, and in her violent and now final death-agonies, bore him to the floor a corpse, and a victim to the terrors he had anticipated.

We cannot even begin to match Poe, but as our double doors throw slowly back their “ponderous and ebony jaws,” we find standing there not Madeline of Usher, but long-time Commodore’s Messenger Janis Gillham, who says she was right there at the Villa Laure with L. Ron Hubbard at all relevant times, and, with terrible assertiveness, with shuddering finality, she proclaims (in an email):

“My passport has us entering Tangiers on Sept 15—that is when we all moved ashore to TRC and Villa Laurie [sic: Villa Laure].”

Cue Alfred Hitchcock’s screeching violins.

In her phone interview she insisted that this was the first time that the Hubbards had lived at Villa Laure, and that her passport was proof positive that the move ashore in Tangier happened on Friday, 15 September 1972, in preparation for the Apollo going into dry dock in Lisbon.

That alone is bad enough to make all the mirrors behind us shatter into millions of pieces of twinkling glass, taking all of our other “sources” with them. But Janis Gillham-Grady said something else in her interview that was even stranger: She insisted that on 15 September 1972, the plan was for the Hubbards to live in the Villa Laure for only three weeks—while the Apollo was in dry dock. But— But— But— Three weeks would only have taken them to Friday, 6 October 1972, and the Apollo didn’t even go into dry dock in Lisbon until almost two weeks after that, on Thursday, 19 October 1972!

Cue more Alfred Hitchcock’s screeching violins.

What part of this story by this Commodore’s Messenger can we believe? Any of it? If we do, we have to accept that the Hubbards bought an expensive villa in Tangier, Morocco, sometime early in 1972 (or in April of 1971, or whenever!), let it sit unoccupied for six months or more, and then planned to use it for only three weeks “while the Apollo was in dry dock”—except that just as with the other so-called “sources” who make this “dry dock” claim, the Apollo was not in dry dock during the relevant time period!

Yet it is from this mysterious villa that Hubbard supposedly masterminded the Morocco missions that this series has been covering, the Hubbards staying there longer than the three weeks only because the Apollo supposedly had to go into wet dock after dry dock. It is from this mysterious villa that L. Ron Hubbard allegedly fled on 29 November 1972—according to Janis Gillham-Grady—because of an alarming phone call saying that Hubbard’s “sec-checking mission” on Islamic intelligence officers of Mohammed’s own descendent, King Hassan II, had “blown up.” [See Part VII: Kaboom! Surprise—Islam and Scientology Don’t Mix. —Ed.]

If we accept these claims of Janis Gillham-Grady, then it’s apparent that she just “fell heavily inward on the person” of Gerry Armstrong, Jon Atack, Bent Corydon, Lawrence Wright, Russell Miller, and Chris Owen, rendering them all “to the floor a corpse” as far as their vague and evasive claims about the Hubbards and the Villa Laure go. She just branded them all, with the hissing heat of her passport, as bare-faced liars.

But— But— But— She is a Commodore’s Messenger who claims that she was right with Hubbard every single day of 1972! And what about some of the other history-makers of Morocco, the other Commodore’s Messengers? Let’s revisit their “contributions”:

TERRI GILLHAM GAMBOA, Commodore’s Messenger (Janis Gillham Grady’s sister): She was cc:ed on many of the questions about the alleged Morocco missions involving the Villa Laure. She never answered any of them.

GALE REISDORF IRWIN, Commodore’s Messenger: Refused to answer any questions. Even though she is believed to have been with Hubbard every day at all times relevant to the alleged Moroccan missions of 1972 and the Villa Laure, she said: “Even if things were going on we were NOT privy to them . . . [I] see no reason for me to go on about it even if I knew something.”

DIANA REISDORF, Commodore’s Messenger: Refused to answer any questions. Even though she is believed to have been with Hubbard every day at all times relevant to the alleged Moroccan missions of 1972 and the Villa Laure, she said: “There has been absolutely nothing asked that I can be of help on.”

Who can you believe at all in any of these tales? That’s up to you, if you think you can believe any of them. But after listening to all of them, it still leaves the question unanswered: What really happened to L. Ron Hubbard in Morocco in 1972? What really happened to the ~$12 million in cash brought to Morocco?

We can’t possibly leave this subject without giving you one more “authoritative” source: The U.S. Tax Court. The IRS had done an exhaustive audit of L. Ron and Mary Sue Hubbard’s taxes, and of the taxes of the Church of Scientology of California, for the years 1971 and 1972 by the time the tax court issued its ruling on 24 September 1984. Here is what the Tax Court said about “the docketed years,” 1971 and 1972:

L. Ron Hubbard, his wife, Mary Sue, and their family lived on the Apollo with other members of the ship’s crew and staff. All staff and crew were Sea Organization members.

Although the ruling mentions the Tours Reception Center in Tangier as an “outpost,” it makes no mention at all of Villa Laure. The U.S. federal government—the same one that stole Hubbard’s OT Levels in 1972 while he supposedly was at the Villa Laure—whitewashed the villa completely out of existence. Fata Morgana. Annnnnnd, it’s gone!

Don’t miss Part IX: Hubbard Hears a Who.

 

 

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Part IX: Hubbard Hears a Who

Saturday, 21 November 2015 by

Part IX of the Research Series, Morocco Phase, for the revolutionary book Watergate: The Hoax

[NOTE: This research series of blog articles arose out of recent research efforts concerning the second half of the book Watergate: The Hoax, currently in release. This series of blog posts represents only a small part of the research done for the book, but the results of this phase were of such a nature that we felt a duty to make them public prior to the book. The relevance of these events to Watergate is fully covered in the book. These posts are for informational, historical, and educational purposes, dealing with issues of very broad public interest. Creative Commons License This work, meaning expressly the research series of articles on this blog, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.—Ed.]

Why did LRH leave Morocco, never to return? Maybe you can figure it out...

Why did LRH leave Morocco, never to return? Maybe you can figure it out…

Within the span of only two days in late 1972—or maybe five or six, depending on which conflicting “history” fairy tale you fall for—L. Ron Hubbard supposedly took not just one, but at least two alarming phone calls, each of which purportedly was a screaming threat to his freedom and safety, each of which sent him fleeing like a hound-chased jackrabbit out of one country and into another.

First, he supposedly took a phone call at the Villa Laure in Tangier, Morocco, that sent him running off out of that villa with only a suitcase on a breakneck ride with Andre Tabayoyon to Casablanca, there to catch a plane, alone, for Lisbon, Portugal. Then when he got to Lisbon, he supposedly took another phone call that sent him rushing for another plane, this time traveling with a male wannabe nurse and a “former” Green Beret, carrying a briefcase with up to $100,000 in cash—that’s $571,318.73 in today’s dollars—bound for New York City.

It’s a jaw-dropping story of international politics and intrigue—if you have the unquestioning mind of a four-year-old listening to a reading of “Horton Hears a Who.” The difference is that Dr. Seuss makes infinitely more sense.

Before we dive into the heart-pounding story of “Hubbard Hears a Who,” let’s pause for a word from L. Ron Hubbard himself on the subject of telephones. In a Hubbard Communications Office policy letter of 26 May 1965, he expressed himself rather clearly about them:

PHONE CALLS

 

Phones are psycho. They have no memory.

 

Overseas phone calls are often incomprehensible and start mysteries. One often has to hang about for 6 or 8 hours in a mystery trying to connect with a call coming in.

 

CABLE or TELEX is far better. Use it.

 

All overseas phone calls are turned down by orgs.

 

Inter-org phone calls even on one continent must be discouraged.

 

Use telexes and cables. Then we can find out what happened.

Any questions? Unfortunately, we can’t “find out what happened.” The reason we can’t—according to some of our steller history-makers of Morocco covered in this series—is that L. Ron Hubbard supposedly made several snap decisions that ripped apart his life and, ultimately, all of Scientology, and he did it based on nothing whatsoever but some alleged phone calls. It probably won’t come as any great surprise to anyone following this series to learn that there is not even a single confetti-sized scrap of evidence anywhere in existence to back up any of the claims of our history-makers, who of course insist that we have to believe them because they were “there.” What we believe is this motto of the book Watergate: The Hoax: “Fiction doesn’t leave a paper trail.”

You can decide who you want to believe. Before we hear their stories, though, there’s one more sentence from L. Ron Hubbard himself that’s worth having him state—given that he has no chance to speak for himself about the fantastical stories of our history-makers. He wrote this sentence in a policy letter called “Problems” on 23 April 1965, just about a month before he wrote the policy about telephones, above, and it gets right to the point as instructions for executives:

“NEVER act on a junior’s data until you have fully investigated the situation.” —L. Ron Hubbard

And now— Wait. What’s that sound?

The telephone is ringing, I say, “Hi, it’s me. Who is it there on the line?”

Former Commodore’s Messenger Janis Gillham Grady will “swear up and down” that the reason L. Ron Hubbard suddenly fled from Morocco is that on Wednesday, 29 November 1972, a Scientology Sea Org member named Peter Warren placed a telephone call from Rabat, Morocco, to the mysterious Villa Laure in Tangier, Morocco, where L. Ron Hubbard purportedly was living and working at the time, surrounded only by a small handful of retinue that was largely made up of our history-makers in this series.

According to Gillham-Grady, Peter Warren had called the villa to report to Hubbard that a Sea Org mission Hubbard supposedly had ordered and had been running, having to do with investigating the top intelligence personnel surrounding King Hassan II of Morocco, had “blown up.” In her story, two Sea Org members (in disguise as something else)—Amos Jessup and Michael Mauerer—had been using a Scientology E-meter (disguised as something else) to do “security checking” on a Muslim pilot who supposedly had participated in an attempted coup on King Hassan II by trying to shoot down the king’s plane. In the “sec check,” they had come up with a “list” of co-conspirators involved in the coup attempt—but had accidentally given this “list” to the wrong person. The very wrong person. (Dramatic, suspensful organ chord here.)

Gillham-Grady’s story is that Jessup and Mauerer had handed this list over to the Moroccan Muslim intelligence officer who had hired the Scientology Sea Org members in the first place—not knowing that they were Scientologists or Sea Org members. (We didn’t concoct this story; we’re just passing it along). The man supposedly was Colonel Ahmed Dlimi. Dlimi, as it turns out from CIA reports, was the head of King Hassan II’s palace intelligence forces at the time. The problem with handing this “list” to him (according to this story we’re told) was that Dlimi’s own name was right at the top as the mastermind of the entire coup against the very king he served. And Hassan II was not just any Islamic king; he claimed to be a direct descendant of Islam’s Prophet Mohammed.

Don’t dare stop to ask yourself how in the world anybody could be so stupid as to hand over to a senior Islamic military intelligence officer a list of treasonous traitors to be executed, when the “list” had that senior military intelligence officer’s own name right at the top. If you do, your head will explode, and you won’t get the rest of the story. Good little boys and girls just sit there quietly and listen.

And so—as the story goes—Hubbard’s cunning plan to take over Morocco as a “safe country” for himself and Scientology by having these Muslim military men sec-checked—without, of course, the Muslims ever finding out that it was Hubbard and Scientology—had “blown up.”

NOTE: Gillham-Grady’s story sort of “blows up,” too, when you learn, as we did from a real historian, that Colonel Dlimi had been on the plane with King Hassan II at the time of the alleged attack on the plane. Some mastermind. Apparently whoever wrote this spy fiction to pass off as “history” had overlooked that and a few other important facts. To learn just how absurd all of this really is, please read Part VI: Amos Jessup on Training Islamic Intelligence Agents to use a Scientology E-Meter and Part VII: Kaboom! Surprise—Islam and Scientology Don’t Mix. —Ed.

So Gillham-Grady claims that she personally answered the phone when a little “Who” named Peter Warren called to report this amazing “blow up,” and she handed the phone over to Hubbard. And he, according to her, apparently forgot everything he’d ever written: With his hair on fire, he ordered that his “steward,” Andre Tabayoyon, pack him a suitcase. On the basis of one phone call (the story behind which is utterly impossible), he supposedly abandoned his wife and children, abandoned an expensive villa in Tangier that he had bought, abandoned the missionaires in Rabat who had “blown up” their mission, abandoned everything, got into a car with only Andre Tabayoyon, and went tearing off into the Moroccan sunset to Casablanca—which was about 3.5 hours away—supposedly to catch a plane to Lisbon, Portugal, where the flagship Apollo was in dry dock.

Do you hear a Who yet?

There are so many contradictions to this story in the record that it’s nearly impossible to figure out where to start, so we’ll just start anywhere:

  • Amos Jessup, who claims that he was was the “in-charge” of the alleged sec-checking mission, also says that he was not involved in any such “blow-up” event with Michael Mauerer and Dlimi as the one Gillham Grady describes. He says he has “no first-hand memory of the blowup itself, or of the handing over of lists of suspects found.” (Is he calling Janis Gillham Grady a liar, or is she calling Jessup a liar? We can’t pull that apart. Does it matter?)
  • Janis Gillham Grady claims that Peter Warren was “in Rabat when he called the villa,” and that Warren was “part of the sec check team,” but Amos Jessup named four people who he says were on the purported “Sec Check mission” with him: Lisa Gerber, Riggs Eckleberry, Mike Mauerer, “possibly” John Bragin. Notably absent from his own “list” is Peter Warren. (Who is lying? Does it matter?)
  • Long-time LRH Personal Communicator Kenneth Urquhart has claimed that John Bragin was in Lisbon, Portugal, with the Apollo and with Urquhart at all relevant times, so could not have been on the “sec check mission” (even if there ever actually had been one) with Amos Jessup.
  • Gerry “Meter Smuggler” Armstrong has said under oath in court that Peter Warren was the Port Captain of the Apollo at this time in 1972, which would mean that Peter Warren had to be in the port where the ship was, and the ship was in Lisbon at the time, not Rabat. So Peter Warren could not have been in Rabat to make any such call (even if there ever actually had been one).
  • Janis Gillham-Grady, contradicting herself, has also said the Warren was the Port Captain during this time period. That means he was in Lisbon, not Rabat.
  • All of that would mean that somebody (“Somebody, you see!”) at the “blow up” of the “sec-check mission” (let’s just pretend for a moment that there really was one) would have had to place an international call from Rabat, Morocco, to Peter Warren in Lisbon, Portugal—which would have been a violation of senior telephone policy. Warren, in Lisbon, would have accepted the intenational call, also in violation of policy, and then Warren in Lisbon would have had to place an international call, in violation of policy, back to Morocco—to the Villa Laure in Tangier. And there, the efficient Ms. Gillham Grady, after one or two ringy-dingies (Snort!), would have had to have accepted an international call from Warren—in violation of policy—and handed it right over to L. Ron Hubbard for him to take in violation of his own policy.
So-called "journalist" Tony "Gold Chains" Ortega calls Jon Atack a "historian," and says that Atack's A Piece of Blue Sky is one of the "very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology." Get a room!

So-called “journalist” Tony “Gold Chains” Ortega calls Jon Atack a “historian,” and says that Atack’s A Piece of Blue Sky is “one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology.” Get a room!

Do you hear a Who yet? If you don’t, you will. Because we have hardly warmed up.

Let’s turn back to Jon Atack—who so-called “journalist” Tony “Gold Chains” Ortega practically bows down to as a “historian.” In Atack’s teeth-on-a-blackboard excuse for a book called A Piece of Blue Sky, here is the “reason” he says that Hubbard fled from Morocco:

For being persistently late for their Scientology courses, members of the Moroccan Post Office were assigned a condition of “Treason.” To the Moroccans, “Treason,” no matter how much it was word-cleared, meant only one thing: execution. The Post Office officials set themselves against the Scientologists, and won. … The panic, starting from Hubbard’s typically exaggerated use of a simple word, ended with an order for the Scientologists to quit Morocco, in December 1972. Hubbard himself was given only twenty-four hours. He flew to Lisbon.

Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Is that Jon Atack I hear—a fine, fine historian, just ask Ortega—calling Ms. Gillham-Grady a liar?

Well, turnabout is fair play, and Ms. Gillham Grady has a bitch-slap (or three) for Mr. Atack:

I will swear up and down that LRH … left [Tangier] because of the Sec Check team’s screw up.  I was right there next to him when it went down. … Russell Miller, John Atack, etc. didn’t do their homework properly as there is only [a] handful of us that were there and knew what went down. … I remember MSH [Mary Sue Hubbard] saying we had a week to pack up and get everything shredded that we weren’t taking with us. … Actually when Hubbard fled, he left everything behind; no one else left until we had burnt, shredded or packed it over the following week. My passport has us leaving Tangiers on Dec. 5 and arriving back in Lisbon on Dec. 6 1972. LRH left a week before us for Lisbon [29 November 1972].

Ouch, ouch, and ouch. Don’t feel bad, Mr. Atack; maybe Tony will kiss it and make it better. But you haven’t finished being bitch-slapped yet. Amos Jessup—who you used as a source in A Piece of Blue Sky—would like to slap you down, too. About your “Treason” assignment claims, he said he “never heard of such a thing.” He should know; he claims that he was on all of the Moroccon missions (let’s just pretend that we believe there ever were any such missions). [See Part V: King Hassan II, Islam, and the Scientology Study Technology. —Ed.]

Do you hear a Who yet, Mr. Atack? Or are those birdies? Don’t feel bad; we think you do show some promise, on the hack level, as a writer of pulp spy fiction. If E. Howard Hunt could make it, you have at least some hope.

By the way, readers: Don’t dare, even for a moment, ask yourself why Colonel Dlimi, suddenly being exposed as a traitor to King Hassan II by being handed a list of traitors with his own name at the top, would have considerately given Mary Sue Hubbard a whole week to burn, shred, and pack everything related to Scientology and L. Ron Hubbard—especially given the element of this story that says Dlimi and the king and the rest of the Muslim military never knew that the “sec-checking” had anything to do with either Hubbard or Scientology to begin with. If you start asking yourself these kinds of questions, not only will your head explode, but the boogie-man also will come out from under your bed when we put you there, and will eat you up. Good little boys and girls just shut up and listen.

At least Janis Gillham-Grady has now told us why it is perfectly reasonable that there is not a scrap of evidence for any of these stories: Just as G. Gordon Liddy says he and a few others did after the Watergate fairy tales, it all was burned or shredded. Tsk. What a shame. Not a scrap of evidence; just “confessions.”

Janis Gillham Grady also says that Russell Miller “didn’t do his homework,” either (she politely didn’t come right out and call him a liar), so let’s revisit his “reason” for Hubbard purportedly having fled from Morocco, as Miller spread it all over the world in Bare-Faced Messiah:

Word arrived from Paris that the Church of Scientology in France was about to be indicted for fraud. There was a suggestion that French lawyers would be seeking Hubbard’s extradition from Morocco to face charges in Paris.

 

The Commodore decided it was time to go. There was a ferry leaving Tangier for Lisbon in forty-eight hours: Hubbard ordered everyone to be on it, with all the OTC’s movable property and every scrap of paper that could not be shredded. For the next two days, convoys of cars, trucks and motorcycles could be observed, day and night, scurrying back and forth from OTC “land bases” in Morocco to the port in Tangier.

 

When the Lisbon-bound ferry sailed from Tangier on 3 December 1972, nothing remained of the Church of Scientology in Morocco. Hubbard left behind only a pile of shredded paper, a flurry of wild rumours and a scattering of befuddled US consular officials.

 

Hubbard did not join the exodus on the Lisbon-bound ferry from Tangier; he was driven from Villa Laura to the airport, where there was a direct flight leaving for Lisbon that afternoon.

WHO (as in “Hubbard Hears a Who”) is lying? Is it Janis Gillham Grady? Is it Amos Jessup? Is it Gerry Armstrong under oath? Is it Jon Atack? Is it Russell Miller? Surely it can’t be Miller, can it? After all, a veritable pillar of integrity, “former” intelligence agent for the United Kingdom Chris Owen, went to all the trouble to republish Bare-Faced Messiah electronically and spread that version all over the world, saying in his Foreward to his version that Hubbard (not Russell Miller) was “a pathological liar, a fraud.” Yet it seems that to accept the idea that Miller and Owen are not, themselves, pathological liars and frauds would be to believe that Gillham-Grady, Jessup, Armstrong, Ortega, and Atack very well might be.

To listen to a woman named Nan McLean, they ALL are liars. In a video declaration sent to a senator in Austrailia, she claimed that her son, John McLean, had been highly placed in the Sea Org in Morocco in 1972, and that one of his jobs had been to “send auditors into a designated area under the command of King Hassan II,” going on to embellish her story with this: “The purpose of this mission was to ‘Find the Traitors.’” Oooooooo! More spy stuff. Sound familiar?

Yes, it has the certain familiar ring of a “talking point” that all good four-year-old minds should accept without question. But then Nan just can’t leave well enough alone. Let’s let her yap on:

John returned [home to Canada from Morocco] on November 9, 1972. … Needless to say, John, after his arrival home, informed the officers [Ontario Provincial Police (OPP)] about the activities of Hubbard and his crew with regards to the Moroccan scene. Our OPP officer’s reported to the RCMP officer’s who reported to the FBI officer’s who reported to Interpol officer’s who informed the Moroccan government officials that the Apollo and its crew were really The Church of Scientology and L Ron Hubbard was its founder. This resulted in Hubbard being denied docking privileges EVER AGAIN in any port of Morocco.

Got that? The whole reason Hubbard fled Morocco is because the Ontario Provincial Police cat-in-the-hat whispered to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police cat-in-the-hat, who whispered to the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation cat-in-the-hat, who whispered to the Interpol cat-in-the-hat the deep dark secret (Gasp!) that “the Apollo and its crew were really The Church of Scientology and L Ron Hubbard was its founder.” And that suddenly cleaned all the Hubbard and Scientology spots off of all of Morocco forever. (Unfortunately, it spread them all over Lisbon, and then Florida, and the rest of the world, but don’t say anything about that, okay? Wait; have we flipped into another Seuss story?)

Norman "What? Me Worry?" Starkey went on to become the "executor" of "L. Ron Hubbard's" estate, working closely with a former Assistant to the Commissioner of IRS, a devoted non-Scientologist named Mead Emory. Emory, together with other non-Scientology lawyers, ultimately reduced to dust the entire corporate structure that L. Ron Hubbard set up, and Starkey helped to dump all of Hubbard's intellectual properties—all copyrights and all trademarks—into a secretive corporation they had created called the Church of Spiritual Technology. Part of the "requirements" of the alleged Hubbard estate papers was a clause requiring IRS "approval" of CST before it could own all of his intellectual property. The appearance that RTC "owns" any of the trademarks is a fraud. CST can buy all of them back for $100 any time in its "sole discretion." At that moment David Miscavige would become nothing but a tacky pompadour.

Norman “What? Me Worry?” Starkey went on to become the “executor” of “L. Ron Hubbard’s” estate, working closely with a former Assistant to the Commissioner of IRS, a devoted non-Scientologist named Meade Emory. Emory, together with other non-Scientology lawyers, ultimately reduced to dust the entire corporate structure that L. Ron Hubbard had set up, and Starkey helped to dump all of Hubbard’s intellectual properties—all copyrights and all trademarks—into a secretive corporation they had created called the Church of Spiritual Technology (CST). Part of the “requirements” of the alleged Hubbard estate papers was a clause requiring IRS “approval” of CST before it could own all of his intellectual property. The appearance that the Religious Technology Center (RTC) “owns” any of the trademarks is a fraud. CST can buy all of them back for $100 any time in its “sole discretion.” At that moment David Miscavige would become nothing but a tacky pompadour.

If you don’t hear a Who by now, you may need a hearing aid. But, though you may not believe it, the best is yet to come.

Norman Starkey was the captain of the Apollo throughout 1972, including this period when Hubbard supposedly fled from Morocco. Through the pathetic PR mouthpieces at the so-called Church of Scientology, here is Starkey’s claim:

Mr. Hubbard was not even aboard the Apollo when she was in the Lisbon dry dock in October 1972. He remained ashore in his villa in Tangiers and told me that he was going to concentrate on some research while I took the ship up to Lisbon and would oversee the refit and renovations to upgrade several areas of the vessel.

 

At that time, L. Ron Hubbard traveled to the U.S. to continue his researches into society.

“At that time”? At what time? And what happened to his sudden freak-out flight from Morocco to Lisbon? Nope. According to Starkey, ALL of our history-makers of Morocco are liars, and old Ronnie-boy just decided one day to hop over to New York City for some “research.”

And for some reason—despite having purportedly had about $12 million worth of today’s dollars transferred in cash to the Apollo a few months before, in “the summer of 1972;” despite having bought an expensive villa in Tangier that he supposedly had sunk untold amounts of money into renovating and refurbishing; despite supposedly carrying with him the modern equivalent of about half a million dollars when he left Lisbon for New York—Hubbard decided to do his “research” by being crammed into a crappy dump of an apartment in Queens, taking along a male wannabe nurse and a “former” Green Beret as roommates.

Why that doubting look? You don’t believe it? Then you don’t want to miss one word of Part X: A Day or Six in Lisbon with Hubbard, Jim Dincalci, and Ken Urquhart. There we’ll meet even more of our history-maker denizens of Morocco, including the elusive Andre Tabayoyon, who supposedly drove Hubbard off into the Moroccan sunset, past airport after airport, all the way to Casablanca, and we’ll learn how Hubbard supposedly got a briefcase full of cash to comfort him in his smelly college-dorm-like life in New York City with his manly roommates.

 

 

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